Biology Club meeting

Majors

Descriptions of the three majors offered by the Department. Information on the required classes for each major.

The three majors offered are Biology, Natural HIstory, and Bio-Medical Sciences. Information on these programs is available from both the links below and from the SBCC Catalog.

Descriptions of Majors

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Biological Sciences Associate in Arts Degree provides preparation for transfer in such areas as Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Pharmacology, Cell Biology, Ecology, Marine Biology, Botany, Zoology, Medical Technology and Pre-Medicine.  More information on this program.

• Biology, Associate in Science for Transfer  (AS-T in Biology) provides the foundational knowledge in Biology to students who want to earn a Baccalaureate Degree in Biology. This degree is in compliance with the Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act and guarantees admission to a California State University (CSU) campus for any community college student who completes an “associate degree for transfer,” a variation of the associate degrees traditionally offered at a California community college. More information on this program.

NATURAL HISTORY
Natural History Associate in Arts Degree provides preparation for transfer in such areas as Natural History, Freshwater and Marine Fisheries and Wildlife Management. The Natural History A.A. can be completed fully online. More information on this program.

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
Bio-Medical Sciences Emphasis: Associate in Arts Degree in Liberal Arts provides a strong foundation for students interested in pursuing a career in the health sciences. More information on this program.

Nutrition and Dietetics, Associate in Science for Transfer.  This degree offers students a basic knowledge in microbiology, human anatomy and physiology, chemistry and nutrition. This AS-T is an excellent preparation for students planning to continue training in medicine, public health and/or other allied health sciences. Students who earn an Associate Degree for Transfer (AA-T or AS-T) are guaranteed admission to a campus within the California State University (CSU) system in a similar major, although not necessarily to a specific campus. More information on this program.

Classes required for majors

BIOLOGY MAJOR
The department's requirements for the biology major includes classes in both biology and chemistry (CHEM 155 and CHEM 156).  Additional chemistry classes, as well as some physics classes and math classes, are recommended for transfer students.  The SBCC Catalog and the specific departments have more information on these classes. Your Academic Counselor can help in selecting your classes. Assistance is also available from the faculty advisers, Eric Wise (office: EBS 324, phone 805.730.4317) and Blake Barron (office: EBS 322, phone 805.730.4244).

  •  Lecture + Lab.  4 units.  On Campus.  Spring and Fall.  Instructor:  Eric Wise
    BIOL 101:  Plant Biology, is the first course in the Biology Majors’ sequence. It is a survey course that covers primary metabolic events including respiration, fermentation, and photosynthesis; the structure of plants; the process of evolution; and ecology. Major plant and plant-like groups are studied including the Archaea, bacteria, fungi, algae, spore-producing plants, and seed-producing plants. BIOL 101 is a 4-unit course consisting of 2 lectures and one 3-hour lab per week.  You must attend lab as it is an integral part of the course.  Sample syllabus

    By the end of of this class the successful student will be able to:
    • 1. Explain the anatomy and morphology of plants and plant-like organisms as well as the functional characteristics of these organisms including their physiology and adaptation to the environment.
    • 2. Describe the diversity of existing and fossil plants and plant-like organisms including life cycles and relationships with one another.
    • 3. Discuss, from a scientific perspective, the molecular nature of living organisms including their chemical composition, replication, and growth.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. C-ID: BIOL 135S, BIOL 140, BIOL 155.

  •  Lecture + Lab.  5 units.  On Campus.  Fall and Spring.  Instructor:  Blake Barron
    BIOL 102: Animal Biology, is a 5-unit course designed for students who are interested in a career in the Biological Sciences or related fields and plan to be Biology Majors. This course is the second in the three-course Biological Sciences Majors series.  Each week you must attend two 80-minute lectures and two 3-hour labs.  You must attend and pass the laboratory as well as the lecture component to pass this course.   BIOL 102 satisfies the SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences and is transferable to  UCs and CSUs as a laboratory science course. However, If you are simply looking to fulfill a general education requirement as a non biology major, either BIOL 100 or ZOO 122/123 would be a better alternate course.  Sample syllabus

    By the end of the course, the successful student will be able to:
    • 1. Explain the basic principles of modern Biology.
    • 2. Explain the diversity and evolution of the major groups of animals.
    • 3. Demonstrate critical thinking and scientific analysis of facts and ideas.
    • 4. Provide evidence of skills in performing field studies and in using modern scientific laboratory equipment and techniques.
    • 5. Exhibit skills in finding accurate information in the scientific literature, and in generalizing on the basis of such information

  • Lecture + Lab+ Discussion.  5 units.  On Campus.  Fall and Spring.  Instructor: Jennifer Betancourt
    BIOL 103: Cell & Molecular Biology studies the cell, the fundamental unit of life. On a cellular level, we will discuss typical cell processes, structures and functions. On a molecular level, we will dive deep into the structure and function of the four major macromolecules and explore the specific and collaborative roles of each in the cell. This course also includes an overview of the scientific method. This may be one of the most challenging, rigorous and demanding courses you take during your academic career. This is a 5.0 unit course designed for students majoring in a Biology discipline and are genuinely interested in a career in biological sciences.  Sample syllabus and schedule.
    Course Pre-requisite(s): ENG 110 or 11OH, MATH 107 or 111, and CHEM 155 or 104

    By the end of the course, the successful student will be able to:
    • 1. Compare and contrast cells: List and describe the universal features of all cells; describe the mechanistic significance of water to all cells, draw and describe the basic anatomy and function of cell structures and organelles; explain the Modern Cell and Endosymbiotic Theories; differentiate between major cell types.
    • 2. Discuss the significance of the four fundamental macromolecules: Draw and label monomers and polymers of each, compare and contrast different types within each category, describe the chemical reaction leading to the formation of polymers, label major chemical functional groups and explain the molecular relevance of each, list the major cell structures they compose.
    • 3. Draw, label and describe functional components of enzymes, and explain their mechanism of action, how they are regulated and their role in overall cell viability.
    • 4. Draw and label the major molecular components of the cell membrane (including phospholipids, glycomolecules and membrane proteins), describe their overall function for the cell and explain what the Fluid Mosaic Model is.
    • 5. List, draw and discuss different mechanisms of molecular transport across the cell membrane, explain how molecular properties of cargo and specific cellular needs impact the type of transport used, and describe how proper regulation of transport is necessary for cell viability.
    • 6. List, draw and describe different mechanisms for cell adhesion and communication, and explain how proper adhesion and communication is significant for cell, tissue, organ and organismal function and viability.
    • 7. Draw and describe, in detailed stepwise fashion, cellular processes of cell growth (interphase), mitosis, meiosis, and cell death; explain how each is regulated and why regulation is critical for cell viability.
    • 8. Describe, in detailed stepwise fashion, the cellular pathways of aerobic and anaerobic glucose metabolism in prokaryotes and eukaryotes; explain how each is regulated and why regulation is critical for cell viability.
    • 9. Draw, label and describe, in detail, the major processes of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes via the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology (Replication, Transcription, Translation); discuss how regulation of each major process occurs and why it is significant to cell viability; list and describe various types of DNA mutations, their effects on gene expression and mechanisms of repair.
    • 10. Draw, label and describe the general structure of a virus, compare and contrast virus life cycles in general and with specific examples of present-day viruses, and describe different applications for viruses in addressing scientific research questions.
    • 11. List and describe commonly used research methods of molecular biology; discuss various laboratory scenarios in which each can be used; work collaboratively in a team to actively apply the scientific method: ask and address a research question, analyze and interpret data, communicate findings via well-maintained laboratory notebooks and formal scientific reports, and provide constructive peer evaluations.
    • 12. Work collaboratively to critically analyze a topic in cell, molecular or developmental biology using scientific primary literature and review articles accessed from scientific publication databases, present a formal summary (oral and written) on findings, and provide constructive feedback and revisions for peers.
    • 13. Command the scientific method in a manner that allows one to: 1) critically test competing hypotheses, 2) distinguish scientifically valid ideas from ideas produced via less evidence-based frameworks, and 3) articulate these distinctions to professional scientists and lay audiences.
    • 14. Use natural selection as a guiding principle to explain the evolutionary origins of different types of cells, as well as organelles and other important cellular structures/processes.

  • CHEM 155 and CHEM 156 are required for the Biology AA.  However, additional chemistry classes are recommended for those students wanting to transfer to a 4-year school as biology majors.

  • Check with the Chemistry department to verify summer classes
    5 unit • On campus •

    Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or CHEM 104 or One year of high school chemistry, MATH 107 or MATH 110C or MATH 137C or SS 110C or or equivalent based on SBCC's Assessment Center placement via multiple measures.
    Course Advisories: ENG 110 or ENG 110H.

    First semester of a two-semester General Chemistry course sequence. Includes laboratory. Topics include the structure of atoms and molecules, stoichiometry, types of chemical bonding and chemical reactions, gas laws, molecular structure, acid-base chemistry, and thermodynamics. Laboratory focuses on collection and interpretation of data, and includes spectroscopy. Required for science, engineering and pre-dental and pre-medical majors.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B1, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5A, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. C-ID: CHEM 110, CHEM 120S.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    CHEM 155 SLO 1 - Demonstrate proficiency in solving mathematical problems related to chemical calculations, defining chemical terms, showing an understanding of the structure of atoms and their relationships within the periodic table, naming and writing symbols of chemicals, writing and balancing chemical equations and performing calculations related to compounds and balanced chemical equations.

    CHEM 155 SLO 2 - Demonstrate proficiency in categorizing chemical equations and performing calculations related to solutions, gas laws and thermochemistry.

    CHEM 155 SLO 3 - Demonstrate proficiency in describing the subatomic structure of atoms and applying this information to the bonding, structure, shape and polarity of molecules and to periodic trends.

    CHEM 155 SLO 4 - Demonstrate proficiency in interpreting phase diagrams, identifying intermolecular forces, crystal structures and colligative properties of solutions.

    CHEM 155 SLO 5 - Demonstrate proficiency in assembling basic laboratory glassware, performing fundamental laboratory techniques, making and recording relevant experimental observations and interpreting the results.

  •  Check with the Chemistry department to verify summer classes
    5 units • on campus
    Second semester of a two-semester General Chemistry course sequence. Includes laboratory. Topics include thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, and chemical applications. Laboratory focuses on collection and interpretation of data, and includes quantitative analysis and spectroscopy. Required for science, engineering and pre-dental and pre-medical majors. (CAN CHEM 4 or CAN CHEM SEQ A [with CHEM 155])

    Prerequisites: CHEM 155.
    Skills Advisories: MATH107 and Eligibility for ENG 110 or 110H.
    Hours: 126 (72 lecture, 54 lab)

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B1, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5A, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. C-ID: CHEM 120S.

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    1. Demonstrate proficiency in drawing Lewis structures and determining the characteristics of alkanes and alkenes; naming alkanes, cycloalkanes and alkenes and drawing Newman projections of alkanes.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in predicting the stability of carbocations, writing the reaction mechanisms and formulas of the products of the reactions of alkanes and alkenes and determining the stereochemistry of chiral alkanes.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in determining the characteristics of alkynes and naming and writing the reaction mechanisms and formulas of the products of the reactions of alkynes, using IR spectroscopy in structure determination and predicting if a reaction proceeds by an SN1 or an SN2 reaction mechanism.
    4. Demonstrate proficiency in determining if a reaction proceeds by an E1 or an E2 reaction mechanism; naming, writing the reaction mechanisms and formulas of the products of the reactions of alcohols, ethers, epoxides and organometallic compounds; calculating the reaction energies of the halogenation of alkanes and using UV spectroscopy in structure determination.
  • Complete all of the following:

    1. All Department Requirements listed below with a “C” or better or “P” in each course (at least 20% of the department requirements must be completed through SBCC).
    2. One of the following three General Education options:
      1. OPTION 1: A minimum of 18 units of SBCC General Education Requirements (Areas A-D) and Institutional Requirements (Area E) and Information Competency Requirement (Area F) OR
      2. OPTION 2: IGETC Pattern OR
      3. OPTION 3: CSU GE Breadth Pattern
    3. A total of 60 degree-applicable units (SBCC courses numbered 100 and higher).
    4. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all units attempted at SBCC.
    5. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all college units attempted.
    6. A total of 12 units through SBCC.
  • These additional courses should be considered when planning a program of study for transfer as a biology major.
    CHEM 211
    CHEM 221
    Organic Chemistry I
    and Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
    5.3
    CHEM 212
    CHEM 222
    Organic Chemistry II
    and Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
    5.5
    MATH 117 Elementary Statistics 4
    Select one sequence from the following:  
    Calculus for Biological Sciences, Social Sciences and Business I
    and Calculus For Biological Sciences, Social Sciences And Business II
     
    Calculus with Analytic Geometry I
    and Calculus With Analytic Geometry II
     
    Select one sequence from the following:  
    General Physics
    and General Physics
     
    Introductory Physics
    and Introductory Physics
     
    Mechanics Of Solids And Fluids
    and Electricity and Magnetism
    and Heat, Light and Modern Physics

NATURAL HISTORY MAJOR
Required Classes, electives, and requirements for an associate degree.
Your Academic Counselor can help in selecting your classes. Assistance is also available from the faculty advisers, Larry Friesen (office: EBS 212, phone 805.730.4118) for online students and Jennifer Maupin (office: EBS 321, phone 805.730.4196) for on-campus students.

  • 3 unit, lecture only, online. Taught both semesters and generally both summer sessions.  Instructor: Larry Friesen.

    BIOL 110: Natural Science is the only class offered by the Biological Sciences Department that is in both Area 5a and 5b of IGETC so it can count as either a physical science or a natural science. Natural Science is a cross-discipline course emphasizing the integration of astronomy, physics, chemistry, Earth science and biology to understand the laws governing natural phenomena through applications of the scientific method. This class introduces you to the physical and chemical principles that are important to an understanding of biological architecture and function. Sample syllabus.

    Sequence of topics: 
      Cosmology: Matter and Light
      Planet Earth: Land, Sea and Sky
      Biodiversity: Evolution and Diversity
      Biochemistry: Cell Structure and Function
      Physiology: How Life Works
      Behavior: Perception, Integration, Response
      Ecology and Biogeography: Population, Community, Ecosystem; Distribution of Life on Earth

  • Lecture + lab. 4 unit.  Online: Spring and summer. Instructor: Larry Friesen. On campus: Fall only. Instructor: Jennifer Maupin.  
    Natural History is a very broad field that emphasizes observation of the natural world. In this course, we study concepts of botany, zoology, ecology, evolution, geology, meteorology, and more, and apply our knowledge to examination of our local natural habitats.  For the on-campus class, weekly labs are primarily field trips to spots of interest in and around Santa Barbara.  These include walks on the beach, hikes in the hills, and sampling of streams and tide pools.  Whether you’ve lived in Santa Barbara your whole life or are new to the area, BIOL 120: Natural History is a great way to get to know your local environment. Sample syllabus (for the on campus class).  The on-campus class is only offered in fall semesters.  

    BIOL: 120 is also offered online.  Students taking BIOL 120 online do not have to live in the Santa Barbara area as the laboratories for the online class are not local field trips.  The labs for the online class expound on the concepts covered in lecture and can be completed from anywhere.

    At completion of the course, the successful student (either online or on campus) will be able to:
    • 1. Describe the natural forces and structure of Earth that influence the geology, atmosphere and hydrosphere and the characteristics of Earth's biomes.
    • 2. Identify dominant organisms of a variety of communities and describe their adaptations to the physical and biological constraints characteristic of the community within which they live and that allow their success.
    • 3. Describe the life histories of organisms from major phyla and explain the strategies that have assured their success through time.
    • 4. Describe food webs and nutrient transfer in different ecosystems and compare and contrast homeotherm and poikilotherm, aquatic and terrestrial, and temporary and permanent trophic pyramid structures.

  • Lecture only, 3-unit.  In 2020, BIOL 140 will be taught in the Spring, Summer I, and Fall semesters.  Instructor: Larry Friesen.
    Principles of Biology is a general biology course emphasizing the diversity of life processes, organisms and their evolution and distribution. Principles of Biology (Biology 140) combined with the optional Biology Laboratory (Biology 141) satisfies the SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences and transfers to all UC and California State University campuses where they will also satisfy a general education requirement for a life science laboratory course. Principles of Biology alone satisfies the UC/CSU general education (IGETC) requirement for a life science lecture course. Sample syllabus.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: No credit for BIOL 140 if taken after 100, 101, 102 or 103.
    Satisfies Natural Science General Education requirement when combined with Bio 141. 

    General Topic Sequence
      Cells: Cell Structure and Function
      Genetics: Inheritance and DNA
      Evolution: Evolution and Diversity
      Biodiversity: Origin and Early Evolution of Life
      Plants: Plant Diversity, Structure and Function
      Animals: Animal Diversity, Structure and Function
      Ecology: Populations, Communities and Ecosystems. 

    Principles of Biology Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the structures and explain the functions of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems describing interrelationships and mechanisms of their integration to support the whole.

    2. Describe the principles of evolution and natural selection, the supporting evidence, and the mechanisms contributing to variety and speciation.

    3. Describe fundamental biomolecular structure and function, metabolic pathways and bioenergetics including the roles of DNA, RNA and proteins in regulating cell activity and their importance as the basis of inheritance, evolution, and biotechnology.

    4. Describe life histories of organisms and their adaptations for successful production of future generations.

    5. Explain and apply fundamental ecological principles of populations, communities, ecosystems and biomes and the geographical distribution of life on Earth.

  • Online:  Fall, Spring, Summer I.  On Campus:  Spring only. 
    Instructors: Larry Friesen (online), Jennifer Maupin (on campus)

    Evolution and Adaptation is a general biology course emphasizing the history of the development of the theory of evolution, the mechanisms by which organisms change over time, and how these changes under the influence of natural selection has produced organisms adapted to the environments within which they live. Evolution and Adaptation (Biology 112) combined with the optional Biology Laboratory (Biology 141) satisfies the SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences and transfers to all UC and California State University campuses where they will satisfy a general education requirement for a life science laboratory course. Evolution and Adaptation alone satisfies the UC/CSU general education (IGETC) requirement for a life science lecture course. Sample Syllabus.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    By the end of the course, a successful student can
    describe principles of evolution, correlate historical events with advances in the understanding of evolutionary processes, describe the underlying genetic basis of inherited characteristics, solve elementary problems of Mendelian genetics and population genetics, explain the underlying bases of classification and taxonomy, describe the functional design of major taxa of each of life's kingdoms, describe the trends of evolution within the major lineages, describe the chemical evolution of Universe and the scientific theories relating to the origin of life, and provide an annotated time scale of the history of life on Earth.

    General Topic Sequence
      Introduction: Hawaiian Honeycreepers
      Evolution: Evolution, Natural Selection and Adaptation
      Genetics: From Mendel to DNA
      Selection: The Origin of Sex to Reproductive Isolation
      Adaptation: Diversity of Adaptations
      Phylogeny: Earliest Life to the Marine Mammals
  • Lecture only, online. 3-unit. Instructor: Larry Friesen.

    Diversity, adaptations and evolutionary history of life on Earth; principles of ecology and evolution. Examination of theories of systematics and nomenclature.

    Course Advisories: High school biology. Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 110 or 110H.
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Student Learning Outcomes
    BIOL 150 SLO 1 - Describe the molecular and structural unity of life, explain how evolution, natural selection and natural phenomena increase and decrease biodiversity, and discuss the reasons that certain areas of Earth are “biodiversity hotspots”.

    BIOL 150 SLO 2 - Describe the history of biodiversity on Earth, the sequence of appearance of organisms in a taxonomic/systematic context, and the times and causes of mass extinctions.

    BIOL 150 SLO 3 - Compare and contrast experimental methods and mathematical formulae that are used to define biodiversity, species richness, abundance, carrying capacity, and population growth and structure.

    BIOL 150 SLO 4 - Describe the characteristics of phyla and superphyla, how morphological characters and analysis of genomes can be used to define and divide populations of organisms of different ancestry as well as unite related groups, and discuss the reasons that some clades are difficult to place on the “tree of life”.

  • 3-unit lecture • Online •  Fall & Spring. May also be offered in the summer • Instructor: Larry Friesen

    Ecology is a general biology course emphasizing the history of the development of the principles of ecology, the interactions of organisms with biotic and abiotic elements of their environment, the growth and distribution of populations, and the relationships that occur within communities. Ecology (Biology 122) combined with the optional Ecology Laboratory (Biology 123) satisfies the SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences and transfers to all UC and California State University campuses where they will satisfy a general education requirement for a life science laboratory course. Ecology alone satisfies the UC/CSU general education (IGETC) requirement for a life science lecture course. Sample syllabus.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture.
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Ecology Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the physical laws of thermodynamics, the driving force attributed to electromagnetic radiation, and the flow and cycling of matter through ecosystems.

    2. Explain biomass transfer via food chains and food webs and the direction, rates, and efficiencies of transfer for different types of ecosystems such as aquatic versus terrestrial and homeothermic versus poikilothermic models.

    3. Research and create essays that critically evaluate fluctuations of populations in time and space, outlining the principles and outcomes of key-factor analysis using specific examples of real populations.

    4. Evaluate the differing hypotheses used to define populations and communities based on biological parameters and geographic range.

  • 1 unit • lab • must have completed, or currently be enrolled in, BIOL 122 • online • Instructor: Larry Friesen

    Ecology Laboratory
    is the companion course to Ecology that provides exercises that illustrate ecological principles. You must currently be enrolled in Ecology or have completed Ecology in order to enroll in the laboratory. The laboratory sequence comprises ten self-contained exercises, independent of the lecture, that illustrate different aspects of population growth, structure, abundance, distribution, and biodiversity. Sample syllabus.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lab
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Ecology Laboratory Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe general ecology principles and how they are quantified.

    2. Design and complete population sampling experiments to determine population size and growth, predator-prey interactions, and reproductive potential.

  • 3 unit • Lecture • online • Instructor: Larry Friesen

    Survey of the history, distribution and diversity of life and the methods by which biodiversity is defined and measured.

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Student Learning Outcomes
    BIOL 144 SLO 1 - Describe the various scientific methods, instrumentation, and graphical technology that have helped to visualize and develop a “multifactor geographic template” that explains life’s spatial variation and that forms the foundations of biogeographic patterns.

    BIOL 144 SLO 2 - Characterize and differentiate the temporal, biological, physical and geographical factors that define the distribution in space and time of terrestrial, marine and aquatic realms and evaluate the concept of “geographic range” of biomes.

    BIOL 144 SLO 3 - Explain how fundamental biogeographic processes such as continental drift, glaciation, and global air and water movements and Earth history have influenced dispersal, immigration, speciation, and extinction that resulted in the changing patterns of life on Earth through time.

    BIOL 144 SLO 4 - Describe zonation on a local and global scale and explain the influences of latitude, altitude and geographic position relative to adjacent biomes or realms.

  • 3 Units • Same as: ERTH 141 • Lecture • online and on campus

    A spatial study of Earth's dynamic physical systems and processes. Interrelationships between the basic elements of the physical and human environments are examined, including geology (plate tectonics; volcanoes and earthquakes), geomorphology (formation and modification of landforms; river, coastal, and glacial processes), meteorology (Earth's atmosphere; weather and climate), and hydrology (water on Earth).

    Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 103 and proficiency in MATH 1 or MATH 41.
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B1, IGETC Area 5A, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    C-ID: GEOG 110, GEOG 115.

  • 4 unit • Lecture + Lab • Online • Instructors: Bob Cummings and Larry Friesen. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer II. 

    Plant Diversity is a general biology course emphasizing the biology of plants and related forms, their structures and life processes and the principles of evolution and ecology that determine plant diversity and distribution. Plant Diversity is a combined lecture-laboratory course that satisfies the SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences and transfers to all UC and California State University campuses where it satisfies a general education requirement for a life science laboratory course.

    By the end of the course, you should be able to describe fundamental molecular, cellular, anatomical and physiological characters of plants and major evolutionary changes that have occurred from ancestral forms resulting in the distribution of plants on Earth. Sample Syllabus.

    Plant Diversity Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Summarize the fundamental molecular and cellular principles critical to an understanding of plant biology.

    2. Describe the history, characteristics and utility of plants that have been used in agriculture and medicine.

    3. Describe the functional anatomy of non-vascular and vascular plants including reproduction and development, primary and secondary growth, and movement of water and food within the plant.

    4. Describe the evolutionary history and characteristics of the four major floras that have occurred since the transition of plants to land.

    For the AA in Natural HIstory, BIOL 101 Plant Biology may substitute for BOT 121 Plant Diversity

  • 3 unit • Lecture only • On-campus and online • Instructors:  Hisaya Fukui (on campus) and Larry Friesen (online).
    On campus lecture offered Spring and Fall semesters.  Online lecture offered Spring and Fall and at least one of the summer sessions.  


    Animal Diversity is a general zoology course emphasizing the variety of structures, functions and adaptations of protozoa and animals. Animal Diversity (Zoology 122) combined with Animal Diversity Laboratory (Zoology 123) satisfies the SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences and transfers to all UC and California State University campuses where they will also satisfy a general education requirement for a life science laboratory course. Animal Diversity alone satisfies the UC/CSU general education (IGETC) requirement for a life science lecture course.

    By the end of the course, you should be able to describe the system by which animals are organized within the various taxa; describe the structure and function of animal cell structures; describe, compare and contrast the structures and functions of the skeletal, digestive, nervous, circulatory, reproductive, endocrine, muscular, osmoregulatory, and sensory systems of animal phyla; describe the life histories of animals from all major phyla; describe the evidence for evolutionary relationships between animal phyla; and compare and contrast the unique features of animal phyla.  Sample syllabus for on campus class. Sample syllabus for online class.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    General Topic Sequence
      Animals: What are animals?
      Radiata: Non-bilateral, radial, and early bilateral animals
      Spiralia: Worms and molluscs
      Ecdysozoa: Animals that shed their skins
      Deuterostomia: Hemichordates, echinoderms and chordates
      Chordata: Early chordates (fishes)
      Tetrapoda: Chordate transition to land
      Amniota: Higher chordates; reptiles (including birds) and mammals

    Animal Diversity Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the origin of animals, the characters that define "animal", and the major trends in the diversification of invertebrates and vertebrates through evolutionary history.

    2. Characterize and differentiate the structural and functional characteristics of major animal phyla and how these have led to a natural, phylogenetic grouping of animal clades.

    3. Describe the major evolutionary changes that have occurred in past and present animal assemblages over time and across oceans and continents.

    4. Compare and contrast the completion of life histories of animals from all major phyla.

    For the AA in Natural History, BIOL 102 Animal Biology may substitute for ZOOL 122 Animal Diversity + ZOOL 123 Animal Diversity Laboratory
    ZOOL 123 Animal Diversity Laboratory recommended

  • 1 unit • on campus • Offered fall and spring •  Instructor: Hisaya Fukui

    In order to enroll in ZOOL 123, students need to have completed, or be currently enrolled in ZOOL 122.  

    ZOOL 123 provides students with a hands-on experience examining a wide breadth of animals representing different animal phyla. By closely examining live and preserved specimens, students will gain a strong understanding and appreciation for the wide diversity in animal life cycles, body morphology and adaptations. Sample syllabus

    By the end of the semester the successful student can:
    • 1. describe the system by which animals are organized within the various taxa,
    • 2. describe the structure and function of animal cell structures,
    • 3. compare and contrast the structures and functions of animal skeletal, digestive, nervous, circulatory, reproductive, endocrine, muscular, osmoregulatory, and sensory systems among the animal phyla,
    • 4. describe the life histories of animals from all major phyla,
    • 5. describe the processes of organic evolution and the evolutionary relationships of major phyla,
    • 6. compare and contrast the unique features among the animal phyla,
    • 7. describe the embryogeny of all major phyletic lineages,
    • 8. identify any common animal to phylum and class
    • 9. accurately and professionally dissect animals from a wide variety of phyla,
    • 10. identify significant internal and external features of animals, and
    • 11. describe functions of structures from a wide variety of animal groups.

  • In addition, 9 units of elective credit, selected in consultation with the Natural History Faculty Adviser, are required to complete the major field requirements. 

    Students may choose Natural History elective courses from the areas of Anthropology, Art, Biology, Bio-Medical Sciences, Botany, Chemistry, Earth and Planetary Sciences (Geology), Environmental Studies, Mathematics, Physics and Zoology.  Students intending to transfer with an AA Degree in Natural History should include introductory courses in general and organic chemistry, physics and statistics. Natural History electives must be selected in consultation with the Natural History Adviser and should be made carefully to avoid problems with departmental approval and transfer.

  • Complete all of the following:

    1. All Department Requirements listed below with a “C” or better or “P” in each course (at least 20% of the department requirements must be completed through SBCC).
    2. One of the following three General Education options:
      1. OPTION 1: A minimum of 18 units of SBCC General Education Requirements (Areas A-D) and Institutional Requirements (Area E) and Information Competency Requirement (Area F) OR
      2. OPTION 2: IGETC Pattern OR
      3. OPTION 3: CSU GE Breadth Pattern
    3. A total of 60 degree-applicable units (SBCC courses numbered 100 and higher).
    4. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all units attempted at SBCC.
    5. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all college units attempted.
    6. A total of 12 units through SBCC.

BIO-MEDICAL  SCIENCES  EMPHASIS: ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE IN LIBERAL ARTS
Required classes, electives, and associate degree requirements.
Your Academic Counselor can help in selecting your classes. Assistance is also available from the faculty adviser, Peter Aguilar (office: EBS 315, phone 805.730.4121).

  • 4 unit • Lecture + Lab • On-campus Spring and Fall semesters, hybrid Fall and Summer I.  Instructors: Peter Aguilar, Patty Saito, Barry Tanowitz

    BMS 107 provides a comprehensive analysis of the structures of the human body with specific emphasis on individual body systems.  It provides an analysis of the gross anatomical and histological structures of each of these systems. The course includes both a lecture and laboratory component and you must receive a passing grade in both in order to pass the class as a whole.  Laboratory includes study of a human anatomical specimen and comparative anatomy. This is a very demanding course that requires a significant amount of dedication and effort on your part – it is the first step for many of you toward your career in the allied health fields.  BMS 107 is transferable to all four-year institutions, including nursing schools.
    BMS 107 satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A.  C-ID: BIOL 110B.

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: BMS 100, 107, 108, 109 and 146 combined: maximum credit, two courses.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Upon course completion the successful student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate anatomical knowledge using specimens, models, and drawings.  
    • Apply anatomical knowledge by demonstrating the functional relationships of structures within each organ system.
    • Integrate anatomical knowledge with modern biomedical practices.
    • Explain the development and interrelationships among the human organ systems.

  • 4 units . Taught on-campus Spring and Fall semesters, taught hybrid in Spring and Summer I.
    Instructors; Peter Aguilar and Barry Tanowitz.

    Course Advisories: BMS 107, CHEM 101 or CHEM 104. Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 110 or 110H.

    BMS 108: Human Physiology offers an in depth study into the basic functions, structures, and mechanisms of action in the human body.  This 4-unit course is designed for students who are interested in a health science related career. Physiology is a challenging class that requires analytical critical thinking skills rather than simple memorization. This class takes you beyond rote memorization and forces you to consider the detailed mechanisms by which the human body performs tasks such as seeing this page in front of you, feeling touch on your skin, contracting muscles to lift food to your mouth, and storing nutrients in the body for later use.  This is a labor-intensive course that requires significant study time.

    BMS 108 satisfies the SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences, transfers to UC and CSU schools as a laboratory science course, and can be used as a prerequisite for entrance to health science careers (e.g. nursing, physical therapy, physician’s assistant).

     We strongly recommend that you complete BMS 107: Human Anatomy, before enrolling in Human Physiology. In order to understand the functions of the human body, it is essential to first explore and master the structures of the human body as they are presented in the Human Anatomy course.  Completion of one semester of college Chemistry (Chem 101 or 104) and/or Bio 100 (General Biology for Non-majors) will increase your likelihood of success in this course. Sample syllabus

    BMS 108 is transferable to all four-year institutions, including nursing schools and it satisfies the SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. UC Transfer Limit: BMS 100, 107, 108, and 146 combined: maximum credit, two courses. C-ID: BIOL 120B.

  •  4 units • lecture + lab • taught Spring and Fall • Instructors: Robbie Fischer and Tami Elmfors


    Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or one year of high school chemistry or CHEM 104 or CHEM 155. Course  advisories: BMS 108, BIOL 100.  Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 110 or 110H.

    BMS 127 is a 4-unit, college-level course designed to meet the needs and interests of students of both health-related sciences and general biology. It includes investigations of the biology of bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, and a variety of Eukaryotic organisms.  Emphases include the structural and metabolic diversity of microorganisms, and the molecular and cellular basis of host-microbe interactions. This course surveys the microorganisms that contribute to human health and human disease and investigates the principles of disease transmission and prevention, virology, genetics, and immunology. Sample syllabus.

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C. CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    • Explain the basic structure, physiology, metabolism, and chemistry of human-associated microorganisms.
    • Compare the pathogenesis of microorganisms, including virulence mechanisms and the human immune response.
    • Characterize infectious diseases, including both clinical and epidemiological manifestations.
    • Using the scientific method and critical thinking, analyze data generated by laboratory experiments.

  • BMS 157: General Microbiology can be substituted for BMS 127.

    Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or one year of high school chemistry with a minimum grade of C or CHEM 104 or CHEM 155.
    Course Advisories: BIOL 100, BMS 108.
    Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 110 or 110H.

    Surveys the biology and ecology of various microbiological taxa: bacteria, archaea, viruses, fungi, protists, and microscopic animals. Emphasis placed on their symbiotic roles in nature, as well as on their evolution, taxonomy, metabolism, and genetics. Associated biotechnological techniques and industrial applications are explored.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

  • Bio-Medical Sciences Electives list
    Bio-Medical Sciences electives should be carefully selected from the linked list in consultation with the Bio-Medical Sciences Faculty Adviser or the Sciences Counselor to avoid problems with transfer. Students intending to transfer with an AA Degree in Liberal Arts: Emphasis in Bio-Medical Sciences should include introductory courses in general and organic chemistry, physics and statistics.

  • Associate Degree Graduation Requirements

    Complete all of the following:

    1. All Department Requirements listed below with a “C” or better or “P” in each course (at least 20% of the department requirements must be completed through SBCC).
    2. One of the following three General Education options:
      1. OPTION 1: A minimum of 18 units of SBCC General Education Requirements (Areas A-D) and Institutional Requirements (Area E) and Information Competency Requirement (Area F) OR
      2. OPTION 2: IGETC Pattern OR
      3. OPTION 3: CSU GE Breadth Pattern
    3. A total of 60 degree-applicable units (SBCC courses numbered 100 and higher).
    4. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all units attempted at SBCC.
    5. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all college units attempted.
    6. A total of 12 units through SBCC.

NUTRITION AND DIETETICS  ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE FOR TRANSFER
Required classes, electives, and associate degree requirements.
Your Academic Counselor can help in selecting your classes. Assistance is also available from the faculty adviser, Peter Aguilar (office: EBS 315, phone 805.730.4121).