Students studying together

Online and hybrid classes

SBCC offers some guidance on how to get started with an online class.  From the Distance Education home page, you can find links to Tech Support, etc..  You can complete the work for an online class anytime and from anywhere which greatly appeals to students with heavy family, work, or other commitments. Because there is not a scheduled lecture time, online students have to be organized and have  their personal time management systems firmly in place so their online class receives the time and effort it deserves.  

The Department offers one online major, Natural History. Students can complete all department Natural History  AA requirements and electives in one year and complete the SBCC associate degree requirements by the end of year two. The Natural History major is designed to provide a broad survey of the diversity of Earth’s life forms and their evolutionary and environmental relationships. By carefully choosing electives, a student may emphasize specialized areas for transfer, including aquatic biology, zoology, botany and environmental biology. 
 
Biology Online and hybrid classes
  • Usually taught both semesters and both summer sessions.  Instructor: Larry Friesen.

    BIOL 110: Natural Science is the only class offered by the Biological Sciences Department that is in both Area 5a and 5b of IGETC so it can count as either a physical science or a natural science. Natural Science is a cross-discipline course emphasizing the integration of astronomy, physics, chemistry, Earth science and biology to understand the laws governing natural phenomena through applications of the scientific method. This class introduces you to the physical and chemical principles that are important to an understanding of biological architecture and function.

    Topics covered in BIOL 110 include:
    1. Atomic structure and chemical bonds 
      a. Origin of Universe, b. Molecular geometries, c. Structure of the physical world, d. Biochemistry 
    2. Structural biomaterials 
    a. Lipids and membranes: volumes and surfaces, b. Protein: wool, silk and spider snares, c. Polysaccharides: cell walls and wood, d. Composite materials: insect cuticles and bone, e. Biological ceramics: egg shells and clam shells 
    3. Optimal form 
    a. Soap films and minimal surfaces b. Cell and tissue architecture c. Natural history of size d. On being large: trees and elephants e. On being small: unicells and mites 
    4. Functional design 
    a. Countercurrent exchange: gills and flippers b. Surface and volume: water conservation in rats and plants c. Support: hydrostatic, internal and external skeletons d. Feeding structures e. Swimming: fins and flagella f. Terrestrial locomotion g. Evolution and aerodynamics of flight 
    5. Fossil reconstructions

  • Instructor: Larry Friesen

    This course is an introduction to concepts of biological evolution, evolutionary processes, and major events in the evolution of life on earth.

    Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1. Describe principles of evolution.
    2. Correlate historical events with advances in the understanding of evolutionary processes.
    3. Describe the underlying genetic basis of inherited characteristics.
    4. Solve elementary problems of Mendelian genetics and population genetics.
    5. Explain the underlying bases of classification and taxonomy.
    6. Describe the functional design of major taxa of each of five kingdoms with special emphasis
    on trends of vertebrate evolution.
    7. Describe the trends of evolution within the major lineages.
    8. Describe the chemical evolution of Universe & scientific theories relating to the origin of life.
    9. Provide an annotated time scale of the history of life on Earth.

    This is a three unit non-major’s biology course that satisfies the SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. This course is transferable to the UC & CSU as a general education life science course. Biol 112 satisfies a department requirement for an AA degree in Natural History, but does not count toward the AA in Biological Sciences. Sample syllabus.
  • Instructor:  Larry Friesen

    The objectives of this course are:
    • 1. Describe the natural forces and structure of Earth that influence the geology, atmosphere and hydrosphere and the characteristics of Earth's biomes.
    • 2. Identify dominant organisms of a variety of communities and describe their adaptations to the physical and biological constraints characteristic of the community within which they live and that allow their success.
    • 3. Describe the life histories of organisms from major phyla and explain the strategies that have assured their success through time.
    • 4. Describe food webs and nutrient transfer in different ecosystems and compare and contrast homeotherm and poikilotherm, aquatic and terrestrial, and temporary and permanent trophic pyramid structures.

  • Instructor: Larry Friesen
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    The course objectives for BIOL 122 are:

    1. Describe the history of Earth, continental drift, climate history, changing biogeographic regions, and major extinctions.
    2. Describe the physical laws of thermodynamics, the driving force attributed to electromagnetic radiation, and the flow and cycling of matter through ecosystems.
    3. Explain the biome concept and compare and contrast different biomes.
    4. Describe homeostasis at the organism, population, community and ecosystem levels and thermodynamic views of the “ecosystem”.
    5. Describe primary production, its measurement, the interplay of light and temperature, and limiting factors in a variety of ecosystems.
    6. Explain food chains and food webs and describe direction, rates, and efficiencies of transfer.
    7. List and define common mating systems and sexual selection and describe the underlying strategies of each.
    8. List, define and describe the elements comprising population structure, size, distribution, range, variation and growth.
    9. Describe the relationship between genotype and phenotype and the extensions of Mendelian genetics to population genetics and evolution.
    10. Define symbioses in both broad and narrow contexts and describe life history adaptations, coevolution, and evolutionary tempo and mode.
    11. Describe predator-prey cycles and the experiments that have been utilized to understand their continuity and stability.
    12. Describe the concepts of phylogeography, vicariance, metapopulations and reproductive isolation and the use of genetic/molecular techniques of analysis.
    13. Describe "biological community" as a natural unit of ecological organization.
    14. Describe the mechanisms used to analyze species abundance, diversity and richness in communities.
    15. Define succession and the concepts of sere, succession, and transient and cyclic climaxes.
    16. Describe geographic patterns of species diversity and the relationship to the concept of niche.

    Sample syllabus for BIOL 122.

  • Instructor: Larry Friesen

    Satisfies SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences when combined with Biology 122. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lab. 
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    The course objectives for BIOL 123 are:

    1. Describe general ecology principles and how they are quantified.
    2. Design and complete simple population sampling experiments.
    3. Describe correlations between principles of ecology and population size, dispersion, range and distribution.
    4. Outline the parameters that affect population numbers under a variety of situations.
  • Taught occasionally.  Instructor: Larry Friesen

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: BIOL 125 and 126 combined: maximum credit, one course.

    The course objectives for BIOL 126 are:

    1. Explain general biological principles as displayed in the rich diversity of aquatic life forms and associations.
    2. Discuss the interrelationships among electromagnetic radiation, the physical environment and living organisms in marine and freshwater ecosystems.
    3. Identify the common living organisms in marine and freshwater habitats and describe the characteristics by which they are classified.
    4. Describe the methods used in collecting, recording and interpreting data related to water analysis, biodiversity evaluation and tracking.
    5. Compare and contrast the adaptations of organisms from different aquatic ecosystems and different phyla.
    6. Describe the history, advances, diversification and biogeography of aquatic life on Earth through time.
  • Instructors; Larry Friesen

    Principles of Biology is a general biology course emphasizing the diversity of life processes, organisms and their evolution and distribution. Principles of Biology (Biology 140) combined with the optional Biology Laboratory (Biology 141) satisfies the SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences and transfers to all UC and California State University campuses where they will also satisfy a general education requirement for a life science laboratory course. Principles of Biology alone satisfies the UC/CSU general education (IGETC) requirement for a life science lecture course.

    General Topic Sequence
      Cells: Cell Structure and Function
      Genetics: Inheritance and DNA
      Evolution: Evolution and Diversity
      Biodiversity: Origin and Early Evolution of Life
      Plants: Plant Diversity, Structure and Function
      Animals: Animal Diversity, Structure and Function
      Ecology: Populations, Communities and Ecosystems

    Sample syllabus
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: No credit for BIOL 140 if taken after 100, 101, 102 or 103.

    The Course Objectives for BIOL 140 are:

    1. Describe the fundamental structures and functions of living organisms at the cellular level.
    2. Describe the great diversity, patterns of growth, and adaptations of organisms.
    3. Describe history and evidence for the origin of life to diversification of major phyla.
    4. Describe principles of evolution and natural selection and the evidence from paleontology, development, comparative anatomy, and molecular biology.
    5. Describe the structure and function of DNA, RNA and proteins.
    6. Describe bioenergetics and the nature of enzymes and metabolic pathways supporting respiration and photosynthesis.
    7. Describe the life histories of plants and animals and the strategies contributing to the successful production of future generations.
    8. Describe transitions of plants and animals from aquatic habitats to life on land.
    9. Compare and contrast the successes of major groups within the kingdoms of life.
    10. Describe the origin, diversification and adaptations of vertebrates over time from fishes through early terrestrial vertebrates to birds and mammals.
  • Instructor: Larry Friesen

    Biology Laboratory is a general biology laboratory course investigating biological principles and techniques of investigation. It satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences when combined with BIOL 110 or 112 or 140. Sample syllabus.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lab
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: No credit for BIOL 141 unless taken after or concurrently with BIOL 112 or 140.

    The course objectives for BIOL 141 are:

    1. Describe general biology principles and how they are quantified.
    2. Design experiments that effectively test the influence of variables on biological phenomena.
    3. Perform laboratory and field experiments using appropriate supplies and equipment in order to gather data and evaluate hypotheses.
    4. Describe correlations between principles of biology and observations of living organisms.
    5. Describe the value and scope of biological investigations in everyday experiences.
  • Instructor: MIchelle Paddack.  Sample syllabus.
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B1, IGETC Area 5A, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable.

    The Course Objectives for BIOL 142 are:

    1. Describe the general nature of science and the scientific method.
    2. Describe the theories proposed regarding the origins of the oceans and the history of their exploration.
    3. Describe the complex marine physical environment including plate tectonics, seawater chemistry and seawater motion.
    4. Describe how the physical environment of the ocean affects marine organisms and how major changes cause unique phenomena (like El Niño and La Niña).
    5. Describe marine ecology including the marine trophic pyramid and marine productivity.
    6. Describe the structure of key marine habitats and adaptations of organisms within them.
    7. Discuss environmental concerns impacting the oceans.

    The Student Learning Outcomes for BIOL 142 are: 
    • SLO 1 - Summarize the physical marine environment on Earth historically, geologically and chemically.
    • SLO 2- Locate and describe the structure of key marine ecosystems and identify the types of organisms within them and their adaptations.
    • SLO 3 - Apply the scientific method to a current situation - conduct observations, ask a question, create a hypothesis, gather data with experimentation and/or observation, interpret the data, and create a conclusion.
    • SLO 4 - Recognize the interconnected marine environment on Earth by identifying key ecological relationships and discussing environmental concerns and actions.

  •  Offered occasionally. Instructor: Larry Friesen
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    The Course Objectives for BIOL 144 are:

    1. Define the natural forces at work on Earth and their influences on organisms.
    2. Describe the physical, biological and ecological features of major Earth biomes and ecosystems
    3. Identify many and varied life forms found in different ecosystems and understand the physical and biological forces that shape ecosystems.
    4. Describe the processes of organic evolution and the evolutionary relationships of major phyla.
    5. Describe the systems by which life forms are organized within the various taxa.
    6. Describe the principles of phylogeography, the factors contributing to the differential distribution of populations, and the mechanisms used to distinguish populations and species.
    7. Describe how the geologic and climatologic history of Earth has influenced the development of biomes and the distribution of life.
    8. Define and use several different mechanisms to quantify biodiversity.
    9. Describe and provide examples from Earth's history of speciation and extinction events using molecular, geologic, and fossil evidence.
  •  Offered occasionally. Instructor: Larry Friesen
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    The Student Learning Outocmes for BIOL 150 are:
    • SLO 1 - Describe the molecular and structural unity of life, explain how evolution, natural selection and natural phenomena increase and decrease biodiversity, and discuss the reasons that certain areas of Earth are “biodiversity hotspots”.
    • SLO 2 - Describe the history of biodiversity on Earth, the sequence of appearance of organisms in a taxonomic/systematic context, and the times and causes of mass extinctions.
    • SLO 3 - Compare and contrast experimental methods and mathematical formulae that are used to define biodiversity, species richness, abundance, carrying capacity, and population growth and structure.
    • SLO 4 - Describe the characteristics of phyla and superphyla, how morphological characters and analysis of genomes can be used to define and divide populations of organisms of different ancestry as well as unite related groups, and discuss the reasons that some clades are difficult to place on the “tree of life”.

  • Offered as a hybrid class in Summer II and Spring semesters.  Instructor:  Patty Saito


    Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. 
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. UC Transfer Limit: No credit for BIOL 100 if taken after BIOL 101, 102 or 103.

    Basic concepts of biology. Designed for non-biological sciences majors with no prior general biology course.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the biochemistry of living organisms.
    2. Explain how cells acquire energy.
    3. Explain the mechanisms of cell division.
    4. Describe the mechanisms that underlie the transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next.
    5. Explain the various processes that drive evolution of species
    6. Describe the structure and function of the major organs systems in animals.
    7. Describe the major interactions between the biotic and abiotic components of an ecosystem
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. Ecology - Recognize ecological relationships between organisms and their environment. Relate relevant topics in biology to the human experience and our impact on the natural world.
    2. Evolution - Recognize evolution as the central paradigm of Biology, and explain how traits observed in living and extinct organisms are the result of natural selection and other evolutionary processes and serve to illustrate the ancestral relationships among all organisms.
    3. Genetics - Define the relationships among DNA, genes, and the expression of traits in organisms. Describe the mechanisms by which genetic information is transmitted during reproduction.
    4. Lab - Apply the Scientific Method, specifically to the collection and analysis of data and the development and testing of hypotheses.
    5. Working Cell - Distinguish major groups of organisms based on cellular structure, acquisition of energy, and reproduction. 
Biomedical Sciences Online and hybrid classes
  • BMS 136 is offered online only in Summer I.  (It is offered  on campus in Spring and Fall semesters.)
    Instructor: Blake Barron

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area E, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Fundamental principles and current research focused on the anatomy and physiology of reproductive systems, hormonal control of reproductive cycles, diversity of sexual responses, basic genetics and heredity, early human development, pregnancy, parturition, causes and treatments of infertility, sexually transmitted infections, contraception, age-related changes in sexual function and behavior, sexual dysfunction and comparative sexual behaviors. Sample syllabus

    Course Objectives:
    1. Explain recent scientific research on the basis and diversity of human sexual behavior, gender identification and sexual orientation.
    2. Identify and diagram the fundamental anatomy of the human male and female reproductive systems.
    3. Explain and characterize the basic physiology of male and female reproductive systems including gametogenesis, the menstrual cycle, puberty, menopause, sex steroid production, sexual dysfunction, basic infertility and the role of the hypothalamo-pituitary axis
    4. Examine basic principles and solve elementary problems of human genetics and heredity.
    5. Summarize the fundamental aspects of sexual arousal, pregnancy, embryonic and fetal development, and parturition (birth) in humans.
    6. Compare, contrast and fundamentally evaluate different modes of contraception and abortion.
    7. Examine and compare the causes of and current techniques used in the treatment of infertility and sexually related diseases and dysfunctions
    8. Describe the physiological causes, symptoms, methods of diagnosis/evaluation and treatments of sexually transmitted infections.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. BMS 136 SLO 1 - Summarize the fundamental cellular and physiological principles critical to an understanding of the biology of human sexuality including the cell theory, the basic structure and functional importance of biomolecules, sex hormones and cell organelles and characterize basic aspects of homeostasis and molecular genetics.
    2. BMS 136 SLO 2 - Articulate basic principles and solve elementary problems of human genetics and heredity.
    3. BMS 136 SLO 3 - Identify and locate the anatomy of the human male and female reproductive systems and explain the essential endocrine and physiological regulation of the gonads and secondary reproductive organs including gametogenesis and the menstrual cycle.
    4. BMS 136 SLO 4 - Describe the basic anatomical and physiological determinants of activity changes that occur throughout a human's reproductive life history including puberty, sexual arousal, fertilization, pregnancy, embryonic development, parturition, menopause, infertility and sexual dysfunction.
    5. BMS 136 SLO 5 - Cite and distinguish the type of causative organism, transmission, symptoms, diagnosis and treatments of the most common sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS. List the behaviors that can increase and decrease an individual's risk of contracting a sexually transmitted infection. Characterize and differentiate the physiological mechanisms of action and the basic procedures involved in the use of the most common techniques of contraception and abortion. Outline the potential benefits and consequences of each technique.
    6. BMS 136 SLO 6 - Construct a properly cited written report in a standardized format based on a search and evaluation of the literature data.
  • BMS 146 is only offered online.  This class is offered Fall, Spring, and Summer I. Instructor: Eric Wise

    Transfer Information: CSUGE Area B2, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: BMS 100, 107, 108, and 146 combined: maximum credit, two courses. 

    Descriptive introduction to the structure and function of the human body.;

    Course Objectives:
    1. Relate the structure of the organ systems of the body with their function
    2. Describe the action of numerous muscles of the body
    3. Identify the gross anatomical features of the organs of the body and
    4. Use the vocabulary that is important to describing human anatomy and physiology in a medical and allied health field setting.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. BMS 146 SLO 1 - Identify aspects of the anatomy of the human body.
    2. BMS 146 SLO 2 – Identify and describe the general features of the physiology of the human body.
  • Hybrid classes are taught with an online lecture and an on-campus lab.  Students need to live close enough to Santa Barbara to attend the on-campus labs.
  • BMS 100 is offered in the fall semesters as a hybrid class and is usually offered online in the spring and fall semesters. BMS 100 will be online in Fall 2021. Instructor: Patty Saito.

    Structure and function of the human body. Non-technical introduction to anatomy, physiology, exercise, fitness and nutrition. Laboratory experiments in human physiology; study of human anatomical materials. Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences, and Anatomy and Physiology requirements for SBCC LVN program. Does not satisfy requirements for ADN majors. Sample Syllabus

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. UC Transfer Limit: No credit for BMS 100 if taken after BMS 107 or 108 or 109; BMS 100, 107, 108, 109, and 146 combined: maximum credit, two courses.

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    1. organ systems - Summarize the organ systems of the human body and correlate the functions of the organs systems with their gross and microscopic structures.
    2. principles - Analyze human structures and functions with respect to established principles in the biological and physical sciences.
    3. interpretation - Interpret results of laboratory investigations in light of the theoretical bases of biomedical science.
    4. musculoskeletal - Demonstrate the skeletal and muscular landmarks of the body and apply the connections between them to infer principles of human movement.
    5. assessment - Assess scientific and popular sources of information within the context of modern physiology, biochemistry, and genetics.
  • BMS 107 is offered in the hybrid format in the spring semesters and in summer I. It is offered as an on-campus class in both the spring and fall semesters.  Instructors: Peter Aguilar, Patty Saito, Barry Tanowitz, Gregg Afman (lab only), Dani Jones (lab only)

    Structure of the human body. Laboratory includes study of a human anatomical specimen and comparative anatomy. Transferable to all four-year institutions, including nursing schools. Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. Sample Syllabus

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. UC Transfer Limit: BMS 100, 107, 108, 109 and 146 combined: maximum credit, two courses.
    C-ID: BIOL 110B.

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    1. BMS 107 SLO 1 - Identify anatomical structures using specimens, models, and drawings.
    2. BMS 107 SLO 2 - Explain the functional relationships of structures within each organ system.
    3. BMS 107 SLO 3 - Integrate anatomical knowledge with modern biomedical practices.
    4. BMS 107 SLO 4 - Explain the development and interrelationships among the human organ systems.
  •  BMS 108 is offered in the hybrid format during Summer I.  Instructor: Barry Tanowitz (It is usually offered as a fully on-campus class in the spring and fall semesters.) Fall 2021: there will be online and hybrid CRNs.

    Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences.
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A.
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. UC Transfer Limit: BMS 100, 107, 108, and 146 combined: maximum credit, two courses.
    C-ID: BIOL 120B.

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    1. Employ the Scientific Method to collect and analyze data, then with those results develop and test hypotheses.
    2. Explain the structure and function of electrically excitable cells found in the nervous, muscular, and cardiovascular systems.
    3. Determine the physiological processes involved in the dynamics of fluids as they affect the circulatory and urinary systems and the internal chemical environment.
    4. Determine the various biological strategies utilized by the immune system to maintain human health and combat disease.
Botany Online Class
  • Usually offered Spring, Fall and Summer II.  Instructors: Bob Cummings and Larry Friesen

    Plant diversity, adaptations and evolutionary history; principles of ecology and evolution. Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences.
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: BOT 100, 121, and 122 combined: maximum credit, two courses.

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    1. BOT 121 SLO 1 - Summarize the fundamental molecular and cellular principles critical to an understanding of plant biology.
    2. BOT 121 SLO 2 - Describe the functional anatomy of non-vascular and vascular plants including life histories, reproduction and development, primary and secondary growth, and movement of water and food within the plant.
    3. BOT 121 SLO 3 - Describe the evolutionary history and characteristics of the major floras that have occurred since the transition of plants to land.
    4. BOT 121 SLO 4 - Produce laboratory and field reports based on plant collection, observation, dissection, and experimentation with proper presentation techniques, data analysis and discussion of results.
Zoology Online Classes
  • Offered Spring, Fall and Summer I. Instructor: MIchelle Kowalewski

    How animals work. Animal physiological systems, perception of and responses to external stimuli, integration of activities, maintenance of the internal environment, locomotion and reproduction.
    Sample syllabus
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Student Learning Outcomes:

    1. ZOOL 110 SLO 1 - Describe individual cell structure and metabolism and the nature of cell-cell communications in immune, nerve, muscle, endocrine and neuroendocrine, and sensory systems.
    2. ZOOL 110 SLO 2 - Describe cellular bioenergetics and processes of feeding and digestion, anaerobic and aerobic metabolism, and thermal regulation.
    3. ZOOL 110 SLO 3 - Describe the structure and function of hormonal and nervous integrating systems controlling rhythms, reproduction, and behavior.
    4. ZOOL 110 SLO 4 - Describe muscle and movement as related to internal fluid transport and locomotory activity.
    5. ZOOL 110 SLO 5 - Describe structural and physiological mechanisms controlling homeostasis of dissolved gases, water, solutes, and metabolic wastes.
  • Usually offered Spring, Fall and Summer I. Instructor: Larry Friesen. (ZOOL 122 is also taught on campus during the Spring and Fall semesters.)

    Introduction to zoology. Animal diversity, anatomy and physiology, adaptations and evolution. Principles of ecology. Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences when combined with ZOOL 123. (ZOOL 123 is offered on campus in Spring and Fall Semesters.)

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the system by which animals are organized within the various taxa.
    2. Describe the structure and function of animal cells.
    3. Compare and contrast the structures and functions of animal skeletal, digestive, nervous, circulatory, reproductive, endocrine, muscular, osmoregulatory, and sensory systems among the animal phyla.
    4. Describe the life histories of animals from all major phyla.
    5. Describe the processes of evolution and the evolutionary history and relationships of major phyla.
    6. Describe embryogeny and post-embryonic growth and development of all major phyla.
    7. Describe the physical and biological parameters that govern the distribution and the size of animal populations.
    8. Describe experiments differentiating innate from learned behavior and demonstrating communication between animals.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. ZOOL 122 SLO 1 - Describe the origin of animals, the characters that define "animal", and the major trends in the diversification of invertebrates and vertebrates through evolutionary history.
    2. ZOOL 122 SLO 2 - Characterize and differentiate the structural and functional characteristics of major animal phyla and how these have led to a natural, phylogenetic grouping of animal clades.
    3. ZOOL 122 SLO 3 - Describe the major evolutionary changes that have occurred in past and present animal assemblages over time and across oceans and continents.
    4. ZOOL 122 SLO 4 - Compare and contrast the completion of life histories of animals from all major phyla.
  • Rarely offered. Instructor: Larry Friesen.
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Introduction to anatomy, physiology, ecology, behavior and diversity of insects and other terrestrial arthropods.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the anatomy and physiology of insects and related forms.
    2. Describe the life histories of insects including reproduction, growth and development.
    3. Provide an annotated outline of the evolutionary history of insects from their origins to diversification on land.
    4. Identify insects to family and describe the characters that differentiate orders and families of insects.
    5. Explain and provide examples of the ecological roles of insects.
    6. Describe methods and results of experiments investigating insect learning and behavior.
    7. Describe the evolutionary history and development of insect social behavior.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. ZOOL 124 SLO 1 - Describe the fundamental molecular and cellular principles critical to an understanding of insects.
    2. ZOOL 124 SLO 2 - Describe the anatomical and physiological characteristics of members of the major insect groups and related forms and how this has led to a natural phylogenetic grouping of insect clades.
    3. ZOOL 124 SLO 3 - Describe the evolutionary history of the arthropod lineage from origins in the sea to expansion on land and flight.
    4. ZOOL 124 SLO 4 - Describe the social behavior and symbiotic relationships of insects, including insects as vectors of human disease.
  • Instructor: Larry Friesen
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Systematics, distribution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of birds. Emphasis on diversity, functional morphology and evolutionary history.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the current theories of bird origins.
    2. Describe the physical principles of flight and the particular adaptations of flighted birds.
    3. Explain the techniques and theories of systematics and the development of bird phylogenics.
    4. Identify and describe the structures of bird anatomy and describe their functions.
    5. Describe inter- and intraspecific behaviors of birds.
    6. Describe the major sensory systems and understand how they function in communication.
    7. Describe bird migrations and theories of navigation.
    8. Describe bird social behaviors and their adaptive advantages.
    9. Describe reproduction in birds and the production and development of the egg.
    10. Describe the factors determining bird distribution and population growth.
    11. Integrate the concepts of functional anatomy, behavior, biogeography and ecology through descriptions of the life histories of birds.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. ZOOL 137 SLO 1 - Describe current theories of bird origins and the diversification of birds through time.
    2. ZOOL 137 SLO 2 - Describe the functional anatomy of birds, related to flight, communication, reproduction, migration, navigation, and social behavior.
    3. ZOOL 137 SLO 3 - Describe bird mating systems, reproduction, egg production, embryogeny and post-embryonic development, and altricial and precocial strategies.
    4. ZOOL 137 SLO 4 - Describe the factors influencing bird life histories, geographic distribution and population growth.
  • Offered online Summer II and Fall.  Instructor: Kris Burnell
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Introduction to animal behavior; methods and results of studies of invertebrate and vertebrate behavior; foraging strategies, social competition, sexual selection, mating systems, cooperation and social organization. Sample Syllabus

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the major sensory systems and explain how they function in communication.
    2. Describe the principles of sexual selection and understand the role of parental investment.
    3. Describe mechanisms of foraging and adaptive feeding.
    4. Describe habitat selection, animal migrations and theories of navigation.
    5. Describe social behaviors and demonstrate an understanding of how they evolve.
    6. Describe the genetic regulation of behavior, how behavior evolves and how we can use comparative methods to study the process.
    7. Describe the development of behavior during an animal’s early life and the various influences that shape this development.
    8. Integrate the concepts of behavior, ecology and evolution through description and interpretation of observed behaviors, focusing on the ways in which the environment shapes adaptive behavior on an evolutionary time scale..
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. ZOOL 140 SLO 1 - Describe and analyze the concept of total fitness. Be able to identify and explain the components of total fitness and demonstrate an understanding of survivorship and reproductive behaviors.
    2. ZOOL 140 SLO 2 - Describe social behaviors and demonstrate an understanding of how they evolve, including an understanding of parental investment, mating systems and parental care
    3. ZOOL 140 SLO 3 - Integrate and apply concepts of natural selection, sexual selection and other evolutionary processes through observation, experimentation and description of adaptive behaviors
Environmental Studies Online and Hybrid Classes

Listed below are the Environmental Studies online classes taught by the Biological Sciences Department. 

  • Offered Fall, Spring and Summer.  Instructor: Adam Green

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Course Content and Scope:

    1. Population Ecology
      1. General population dynamics, carrying capacity
      2. Human population demographics
        1. Resource use; ecological footprint
    2. Food
      1. Agriculture; soils; contemporary agroecosystems; herbicide and pesticide usage; integrated pest control; alternative agriculture; world food supplies, and supplies vs. population.
      2. Animal protein sources: livestock; fisheries; aquaculture.
    3. Water
      1. Hydrologic cycle; watersheds; wetlands; oceans
      2. Freshwater supplies; aquifers, water table, and surface waters; water pollution; wastewater treatment.
    4. Air
      1. Atmosphere; pollution; smog, global climate change, ozone depletion.
    5. Energy
      1. Historical development of use; current use and sources; alternatives.
      2. Impacts of acquisition and use
    6. Toxins in the environment
      1. Sources: industry, wastes, biocides
      2. Human and wildlife health effects; biomagnification; ecosystem effects.
      3. Current waste management practice; reduction, re-use, recycling and alternatives.
      4. Alternative products
    7. Ecological Concepts
      1. Evolution; energy flow in an ecosystem; food chains; food webs; material cycles.
      2. Biodiversity; habitat loss; invasive species; causes of extinction.
  • ENVS 110 is offered as a hybrid class in Spring and Fall semesters.  In the hybrid class format, students attend one lecture/week on campus and have one lecture/week online.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Course Content and Scope:

    1. Population Ecology
      1. General population dynamics, carrying capacity
      2. Human population demographics
        1. Resource use; ecological footprint
    2. Food
      1. Agriculture; soils; contemporary agroecosystems; herbicide and pesticide usage; integrated pest control; alternative agriculture; world food supplies, and supplies vs. population.
      2. Animal protein sources: livestock; fisheries; aquaculture.
    3. Water
      1. Hydrologic cycle; watersheds; wetlands; oceans
      2. Freshwater supplies; aquifers, water table, and surface waters; water pollution; wastewater treatment.
    4. Air
      1. Atmosphere; pollution; smog, global climate change, ozone depletion.
    5. Energy
      1. Historical development of use; current use and sources; alternatives.
      2. Impacts of acquisition and use
    6. Toxins in the environment
      1. Sources: industry, wastes, biocides
      2. Human and wildlife health effects; biomagnification; ecosystem effects.
      3. Current waste management practice; reduction, re-use, recycling and alternatives.
      4. Alternative products
    7. Ecological Concepts
      1. Evolution; energy flow in an ecosystem; food chains; food webs; material cycles.
      2. Biodiversity; habitat loss; invasive species; causes of extinction.