Professor Blake Barron and friend

Liberal Arts, Associate in Arts: Bio-Medical Sciences

An AA option for students seeking a career in the health sciences.

The Liberal Arts: Emphasis in Biomedical Sciences provides an AA degree option to students seeking a career in the health sciences.  In the U.S., there is, and will continue to be, an increasing need for not only qualified nurses and doctors but also for the support and patient education staff of hospitals, physician group practices and clinics. An AA degree would legitimize the functional knowledge of students allowing them to more readily obtain clinical, aide, or front desk positions.  Potential employers could include group medical practices, dental offices, chiropractic offices, neighborhood clinics, hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, public health education departments, physical therapy clinics, vocational rehabilitation clinics and hospice care settings, 

Requirements for this degree

Click here for more information about the Biomedical Sciences classes.

• Students intending to transfer with an AA degree in Liberal Arts; Emphasis in Biomedical Sciences should include introductory courses in general and organic chemistry, physics, and statistics. Electives should be carefully selected in consultation with the Biomedical Sciences Faculty Advisor (Peter Aguilar) or the Sciences Counselor to avoid problems with transfer. 


  • 4 unit • Lecture + Lab • On-campus Spring and Fall semesters, hybrid Fall and Summer I.  Instructors: Peter Aguilar, Patty Saito, Barry Tanowitz

    BMS 107 provides a comprehensive analysis of the structures of the human body with specific emphasis on individual body systems.  It provides an analysis of the gross anatomical and histological structures of each of these systems. The course includes both a lecture and laboratory component and you must receive a passing grade in both in order to pass the class as a whole.  Laboratory includes study of a human anatomical specimen and comparative anatomy. This is a very demanding course that requires a significant amount of dedication and effort on your part – it is the first step for many of you toward your career in the allied health fields.  BMS 107 is transferable to all four-year institutions, including nursing schools.
    BMS 107 satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A.  C-ID: BIOL 110B.

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: BMS 100, 107, 108, 109 and 146 combined: maximum credit, two courses.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    Upon course completion the successful student will be able to:
    • Demonstrate anatomical knowledge using specimens, models, and drawings.  
    • Apply anatomical knowledge by demonstrating the functional relationships of structures within each organ system.
    • Integrate anatomical knowledge with modern biomedical practices.
    • Explain the development and interrelationships among the human organ systems.

  • 4 units . Taught on-campus Spring and Fall semesters, taught hybrid in Spring and Summer I.
    Instructors; Peter Aguilar and Barry Tanowitz.

    Course Advisories: BMS 107, CHEM 101 or CHEM 104. Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 110 or 110H.

    BMS 108: Human Physiology offers an in depth study into the basic functions, structures, and mechanisms of action in the human body.  This 4-unit course is designed for students who are interested in a health science related career. Physiology is a challenging class that requires analytical critical thinking skills rather than simple memorization. This class takes you beyond rote memorization and forces you to consider the detailed mechanisms by which the human body performs tasks such as seeing this page in front of you, feeling touch on your skin, contracting muscles to lift food to your mouth, and storing nutrients in the body for later use.  This is a labor-intensive course that requires significant study time.

    BMS 108 satisfies the SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences, transfers to UC and CSU schools as a laboratory science course, and can be used as a prerequisite for entrance to health science careers (e.g. nursing, physical therapy, physician’s assistant).

     We strongly recommend that you complete BMS 107: Human Anatomy, before enrolling in Human Physiology. In order to understand the functions of the human body, it is essential to first explore and master the structures of the human body as they are presented in the Human Anatomy course.  Completion of one semester of college Chemistry (Chem 101 or 104) and/or Bio 100 (General Biology for Non-majors) will increase your likelihood of success in this course. Sample syllabus

    BMS 108 is transferable to all four-year institutions, including nursing schools and it satisfies the SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. UC Transfer Limit: BMS 100, 107, 108, and 146 combined: maximum credit, two courses. C-ID: BIOL 120B.

  •  4 units • lecture + lab • taught Spring and Fall • Instructors: Robbie Fischer and Tami Elmfors


    Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or one year of high school chemistry or CHEM 104 or CHEM 155. Course  advisories: BMS 108, BIOL 100.  Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 110 or 110H.

    BMS 127 is a 4-unit, college-level course designed to meet the needs and interests of students of both health-related sciences and general biology. It includes investigations of the biology of bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, and a variety of Eukaryotic organisms.  Emphases include the structural and metabolic diversity of microorganisms, and the molecular and cellular basis of host-microbe interactions. This course surveys the microorganisms that contribute to human health and human disease and investigates the principles of disease transmission and prevention, virology, genetics, and immunology. Sample syllabus.

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C. CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    • Explain the basic structure, physiology, metabolism, and chemistry of human-associated microorganisms.
    • Compare the pathogenesis of microorganisms, including virulence mechanisms and the human immune response.
    • Characterize infectious diseases, including both clinical and epidemiological manifestations.
    • Using the scientific method and critical thinking, analyze data generated by laboratory experiments.

  •  4 units • lecture + lab • on campus  • rarely offered

     

  •  Student Learning Outcomes:
    1 - Solve mathematical problems related to chemical calculations, define chemical terms and explain the structure of atoms and their relationships within the periodic table.

    2 - Name and write symbols of chemicals; write, balance and categorize chemical equations and perform calculations related to compounds and balanced chemical equations.

    3 - Describe the subatomic structure of atoms and apply this information to the bonding, structure, shape and polarity of molecules and to calculate the relationships of gases

    4 - Describe and calculate relationships associated with chemical equations including solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium, and oxidation-reduction processes.

    5 - Assemble basic laboratory glassware, perform fundamental laboratory techniques, make and record relevant experimental observations and interpret the results.

     
  • Student Learning Outcomes:

    1. Demonstrate proficiency in solving mathematical problems related to chemical calculations, defining chemical terms, showing an understanding of the structure of atoms and their relationships within the periodic table, naming and writing symbols of chemicals, describing the subatomic structure of atoms and applying this information to the bonding, structure, shape and polarity of molecules and describing oxidation-reduction reactions.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in writing and balancing chemical equations and performing calculations related to compounds, calculating the relationships of gases, describing and calculating relationships associated with chemical equations including solutions, acids and bases and nuclear processes.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in the chemical nomenclature and reactions of the various organic functional groups (unsaturated hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines and amides).
    4. Demonstrate proficiency in drawing and describing the functions of biochemical molecules including carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins and nucleic acids.
    5. Demonstrate proficiency in assembling basic laboratory glassware, performing fundamental laboratory techniques, making and recording relevant experimental observations and interpreting the results



  •  Student Learning Outcomes:
    1.  - Demonstrate proficiency in solving mathematical problems related to chemical calculations, defining chemical terms, showing an understanding of the structure of atoms and their relationships within the periodic table, naming and writing symbols of chemicals, writing and balancing chemical equations and performing calculations related to compounds and balanced chemical equations.
    2.  - Demonstrate proficiency in categorizing chemical equations and performing calculations related to solutions, gas laws and thermochemistry.
    3.  - Demonstrate proficiency in describing the subatomic structure of atoms and applying this information to the bonding, structure, shape and polarity of molecules and to periodic trends.
    4.  - Demonstrate proficiency in interpreting phase diagrams, identifying intermolecular forces, crystal structures and colligative properties of solutions.
    5.  - Demonstrate proficiency in assembling basic laboratory glassware, performing fundamental laboratory techniques, making and recording relevant experimental observations and interpreting the results.
  • Select 13 units from the Bio-Medical Sciences Electives list. Bio-Medical Sciences electives should be carefully selected from the list below in consultation with the Bio-Medical Sciences Faculty Adviser (Peter Aguilar, EBS 315, 805.730.4121) or the Sciences Counselor to avoid problems with transfer. Students intending to transfer with an AA Degree in Liberal Arts: Emphasis in Bio-Medical Sciences should include introductory courses in general and organic chemistry, physics and statistics.
    Bio-Medical Sciences Electives:  
    AH 120 Medical Terminology 1
    ANTH 101 Physical Anthropology 3
    ANTH 103 Introduction To Cultural Anthropology 3
    ANTH 104 Language and Culture 3
    ART 122 Advanced Drawing 3
    ART 123 Figure and Portrait Drawing 3
    BIOL 100 Concepts Of Biology 4
    BIOL 101 Plant Biology 4
    BIOL 102 Animal Biology 5
    BIOL 103 Cell and Molecular Biology 5
    BIOL 110 Natural Science 3-4
    or BIOL 110H Natural Science, Honors
    BIOL 112 Evolution And Adaptation 3
    BIOL 116 Biological Illustration 4
    BIOL 120 Natural History 4
    BIOL 140 Principles Of Biology 3
    BIOL 141 Biology Laboratory 2
    BIOL 291 Seminars In Biology 2
    BMS 118 Human Microanatomy 3
    BMS 119C Human Dissection of the Torso 1
    BMS 128 Human Nutrition 3
    BMS 128L Human Nutrition Laboratory 1
    BMS 136 Biology Of Human Sexuality 3
    BMS 146 Human Form and Function 3
    BOT 100 Concepts Of Botany 2 4
    BOT 121 Plant Diversity 2 4
    BOT 123 Field Botany 3
    BOT 129 Survey Of Earth's Vegetation 3
    CHEM 156 General Chemistry II 5
    CHEM 211 Organic Chemistry I 3
    CHEM 212 Organic Chemistry II 3
    CHEM 221 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 2.3
    CHEM 222 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 2.5
    CIM 100 Cancer Registry Management I 3
    CIM 125 Cancer Disease Management 4
    CIM 225 Cancer Registry Management II 2
    CIM 250 Cancer Statistics And Epidemiology 3
    COMM 101 Introduction to Communication 3
    COMM 121 Interpersonal Communication 3
    or COMM 121H Interpersonal Communication, Honors
    or COMM 122 Mediated Interpersonal Communication
    COMM 131 Fundamentals Of Public Speaking 3
    or COMM 131H Fundamentals Of Public Speaking, Honors
    COMM 141 Small Group Communication 3
    COMM 151 Intercultural Communication 3
    EMT 110 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic 6
    HE 101 Personal Health Awareness 3
    HE 102 Personal Health for Women 3
    HE 103 Responding to Medical Emergencies 3
    HE 104 Introduction to Athletic Injuries 3
    HE 108 Advanced Assessment And Treatment Of Athletic Injuries 3
    HIT 101 Introduction To Health Information Management 3
    HIT 135 Basic Medical Terminology 3
    HIT 201 Pharmacology For Allied Health 2
    HIT 204 Basic Pathophysiology 3
    HIT 220 HIM Statistics 2
    HIT 265 HIM Computer Applications 3
    MATH 107 Intermediate Algebra 7 5
    MATH 117 Elementary Statistics 4
    or PSY 150 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences
    MATH 130 Calculus for Biological Sciences, Social Sciences and Business I 5
    MATH 131 Calculus For Biological Sciences, Social Sciences And Business II 3
    MATH 137 College Algebra 5
    MATH 138 Precalculus - College Algebra and Trigonometry 4
    MATH 150 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 5
    MATH 160 Calculus With Analytic Geometry II 5
    PE 200 Introduction to Kinesiology 3
    PHIL 204 History And Philosophy Of The Great Ideas Of Physics 3
    PHSC 103 The Physical Universe 4
    PHYS 101 Conceptual Physics 3
    PHYS 101L Conceptual Physics Laboratory 1
    PHYS 102 Introductory Physics For Science Majors 4
    PHYS 105 General Physics 4
    PHYS 106 General Physics 4
    PHYS 110 Introductory Physics 4
    PHYS 111 Introductory Physics 4
    PSY 100 General Psychology 3-4
    or PSY 100H General Psychology, Honors
    PSY 105 Applied Behavior Analysis 2
    PSY 110 Introduction to Physiological Psychology 3
    PSY 115 Psychology Of Health And Effective Behavior 3
    PSY 120 Introduction To Psychology 3
    PSY 125 Psychology Of Human Sexuality 4
    PSY 130 Personality Dynamics And Effective Behavior 3
    PSY 140 Child Development 3
    PSY 145 Human Development 3
    PSY 170 Abnormal Psychology 3
    PSY 175 Social Psychology: Psychological Perspective 3
    SOC 101 Introduction To Sociology 3-4
    or SOC 101H Introduction to Sociology, Honors
    SOC 103 Marriage, Family and Intimacy 3
    SOC 104 Social Psychology 3
    SOC 106 Sociology of Deviance 3
    SOC 109 Social Problems 3
    SOC 113 Sociology Of Sex and Gender 3
    ZOOL 110 Animal Physiology 3
    ZOOL 122 Animal Diversity 3
    ZOOL 123 Animal Diversity Laboratory 1
    ZOOL 140 Animal Behavior 3
    1. All Department Requirements with a “C” or better or “P” in each course (at least 20% of the department requirements must be completed through SBCC).
    2. One of the following three General Education options:
      1. OPTION 1: A minimum of 18 units of SBCC General Education Requirements (Areas A-D) and Institutional Requirements (Area E) and Information Competency Requirement (Area F) OR
      2. OPTION 2: IGETC Pattern OR
      3. OPTION 3: CSU GE Breadth Pattern
    3. A total of 60 degree-applicable units (SBCC courses numbered 100 and higher).
    4. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all units attempted at SBCC.
    5. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better in all college units attempted.
    6. A total of 12 units through SBCC.

• Degree Works  is an electronic educational planning tool that allows you to check your status toward an SBCC Degree or Certificate based on your SBCC coursework. Counselors prepare Student Educational Plans (SEPs) in Degree Works to help students map out their pathways to their goals. Check out Degree Works by logging into Pipeline and going to Course Planning under the Student tab. Click HERE for step-by-step instructions to access Degree Works.