SBCC Adventure Club HIke

Survey and overview courses

Classes listed on this page offer either a general introduction to an area of biology, an overview of a major tenet of biology, or a study of diversity.  

Principles and Concepts classes
  • BIOL 100: Concepts of Biology is an introductory, non-majors course that surveys topics of life science from genetics and cells to organisms and evolution.  This course (lecture + laboratory) satisfies the SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences and transfers to both UC and CSU as a general education laboratory science course.  Be prepared for a fun and challenging learning experience! Biology is inherently interesting, but the amount of material and nature of the subject matter do require a good deal of study time. Sample syllabus

    Offered on campus Spring and Fall.  Offered as a hybrid (online lecture with on campus lab) in Summer II and Spring.

    At the end of the course, successful students should be able to:

    1 - Recognize ecological relationships between organisms and their environment. Relate relevant topics in biology to the human experience and our impact on the natural world.

    2 - Distinguish major groups of organisms based on cellular structure, acquisition of energy, and reproduction.

    3 - Define the relationships among DNA, genes, and the expression of traits in organisms. Describe the mechanisms by which genetic information is transmitted during reproduction.

    4 - Use critical thinking skills to apply the scientific method, specifically to the collection and analysis of data and the development and testing of hypotheses.

    5 - Recognize evolution as the central paradigm of Biology, and explain how traits observed in living and extinct organisms are the result of natural selection and other evolutionary processes and serve to illustrate the ancestral relationships among all organisms.

  • Usually offered in Spring, Summer I, Summer II, and Fall. Instructor: Larry Friesen

    Natural Science is a cross-discipline course emphasizing the integration of astronomy, physics, chemistry, Earth science and biology to understand the laws governing natural phenomena through applications of the scientific method. In combination with BIOL 141: Biology Lab, BIOL 110 satisfies SBCC's General Education requirement in Natural Sciences.

    The Student Learning Outcomes for BIOL 110 are:
    • List and describe the physical forces and elements important to life on Earth, including interactions of electromagnetic radiation and matter, light and color, how solar radiation is distributed through movements of wind and water, and how metabolic activities are used to develop complex biological architectures.

    • Compute and describe mathematically/graphically, with appropriate examples, the stresses (compression, tension, strain and shear) that may be applied to biomaterials and the generation of optimal form in living organisms, considering surface-to-volume relationships, strengths and durability of materials, and how their structures resist failure.

    • Describe mechanical and chemical principles underlying growth, maintenance and locomotion of organisms, including metabolism and bioenergetics, allometric growth, structural support, nutrient transport, nerve conduction, muscle contraction, and different modes of locomotion and/or transport.

    • Compare and contrast metabolic and structural adaptations of organisms that allow their successes in different habitats and how organisms respond to changing conditions.

    Sample Assignments:
    All exams are of the narrative essay form following a style guide specific to the course. Each exam comprises four or five questions (with subparts) requiring use of information from the course textbook, course lectures, and other sources as assigned. Sample Question: Describe the fundamental characteristics of structural materials produced by animals and how these materials meet their functional requirements. Include in your answer the definitions of stress, strain, stiffness, plastic, elastic and strength while comparing spider silk protein and synthetically produced nylon and rayon.

  • Offered in Summer I and Fall. Instructor: Larry Friesen 
    BIOL 140 is only offered online.  The companion lab, BIOL 141, is also offered only online. 

    Basic principles of cells, genetics, evolution, biodiversity and ecology. Designed for Natural History majors. Satisfies Natural Science General Education requirement when combined with Bio 141.

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: No credit for BIOL 140 if taken after 100, 101, 102 or 103.

    BIOL 140 has four Student Learning Outcomes:
    • BIOL 140 SLO 1 - Describe the structures and explain the functions of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems describing interrelationships and mechanisms of their integration to support the whole.
    • BIOL 140 SLO 2 - Describe the principles of evolution and natural selection, the supporting evidence, and the mechanisms contributing to variety and speciation.
    • BIOL 140 SLO 3 - Describe fundamental biomolecular structure and function, metabolic pathways and bioenergetics including the roles of DNA, RNA and proteins in regulating cell activity and their importance as the basis of inheritance, evolution, and biotechnology.
    • BIOL 140 SLO 4 - Explain and apply fundamental ecological principles of life histories, populations, communities, ecosystems and biomes and the geographical distribution of life on Earth.

  • Instructor: Larry Friesen
    Prerequisites: BIOL 110 or. Corequisites: BIOL 112 or BIOL 140.

    Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences when combined with BIOL 110 or 112 or 140. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lab

    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: No credit for BIOL 141 unless taken after or concurrently with BIOL 112 or 140.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    BIOL 141 SLO 1 - Use the basic methods, instrumentation, and quantitative analytical skills used to conduct biological research.
    BIOL 141 SLO 2 - Produce original research reports and review papers in a standard scientific format based on laboratory, field experiments, and literature searches that include critical quantitative and qualitative evaluation of data to effectively communicate results, interpretations, and concepts.

    Sample Assignments:
    Data collected during lab and field exercises are used by students during the writing of research reports in which they present and analyze data and answer specific questions about their results. Sample Question: Explain the relative Rf values of each of the 20 amino acids from thin-layer chromatography based on molecular structure, charge and polarity.

    Required Assignments:

    Assigned reading from lab and lecture supplements. Assigned reading from outside sources. Participation in discussions. Participation in laboratory exercises and field trips and submission of laboratory reports.

    Methods of Evaluation:

    1. Participation in discussions
    2. Participation in laboratory exercises and field trips
    3. Research reports on selected lab and field exercises
  • BOT 100 is offered Spring and Fall semesters.  Instructor: Matt Kay.

    Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 110 or 110H. Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 lab)
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. UC Transfer Limit: No credit for BOT 100 if taken after BOT 121; BOT 100, 121, and 122 combined: maximum credit, two courses.

     BOT 100 emphasizes a wide range of biological principles from DNA, cells & physiology to evolution, ecology & organismal diversity, all in relation to plant biology.  In addition, you learn plant structure and function along with the role of plants in the biosphere and society.  BOT 100 is designed for non-Biological Sciences majors with no prior general botany course. Biology majors are welcome to take this course in preparation for other courses in the Biological Sciences, however, Biology majors will not receive credit toward their major for this course.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    • BOT 100 SLO 3 - Compare and contrast the major evolutionary lineages of plants and plant-like organisms, including important structural features of each lineage, ecological importance, and human uses
    • BOT 100 SLO 2 - Describe the anatomy and physiology of plants and plant-like organims
    • BOT 100 SLO 1 - Describe fundamental processes operative throughout botany and plant biology, including evolution via natural selection, sexual reproduction, photosynthesis, basic chemistry, and biochemical processes (cellular respiration, fermentation, photosynthesis)

  • BMS 100 is offered on campus in Spring and Fall semesters.  It is offered as a hybrid class (online lecture with on campus lab) in Fall semester and Summer II (offered online in Fall 2021).  Instructor: Patty Saito.

    Course Advisories: One semester High School Biology. Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 110 or ENG 110H. Hours: 108 (54 lecture, 54 lab)

    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C,
    CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. UC Transfer Limit: No credit for BMS 100 if taken after BMS 107 or 108 or 109; BMS 100, 107, 108, 109, and 146 combined: maximum credit, two courses.

    BMS 100: The Human Body is a 4 unit non-technical introduction to human anatomy and physiology emphasizing health and disease.   IT satisfies the SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences as well as the Anatomy and Physiology requirements for the SBCC LVN Program.  It does not satisfy requirements for ADN (Associate Degrees in Nursing) majors.  Sample syllabus.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the human body in detail and
    2. correlate the structure of the organ systems of the body with their function.
    3. Distinguish tissues based on histological examination,
    4. Demonstrate the origin, insertion and action of major muscles of the body,
    5. Recognize the gross anatomical features of the organs of the body, and
    6. identify anatomical features in cadaver material, in illustrations, on models or in related animal specimens.

Introductory, overview and survey classes.
  • Environmental studies combines science with culture and human values. This course centers on the key concepts and the scientific principles that provide the necessary foundation to understand the myriad of human impacts on our planet. During classes we will discuss these topics to incorporate the cultural and human value issues that accompany the science.  A greater understanding of how we impact the world makes us informed consumers, voters, parents, and citizens of the world. 

    Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences when combined with ENVS 111. (Required for the Environmental Studies major.)
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Course Objectives:
    1. describe and demonstrate understanding of the biological significance of human activities influencing environmental change,
    2. describe the physical, biological, political and cultural interactions that have impacts on the environment and organismic populations,
    3. determine the growth and variations in populations and their interactions with the environment
    4. explain and correlate human alteration and intervention in areas of agriculture, forestry, water and air resources, wildlife, water pollution, toxic waste. pesticides and energy
    5. Incorporate accurate and up-to-date information from books, articles, and internet sources to critically analyze current and future problems.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. ENVS 110 SLO 1 - Explain and apply the fundamentals of evolution and population dynamics to the interaction of humans with the biological world.
    2. ENVS 110 SLO 2 - Explain how ecosystem function affects and is affected by producing food, securing water and producing energy and the resulting consequences for human populations.
    3. ENVS 110 SLO 3 - Analyze the sources of pollution and their impacts on ecosystems and human health.
  • ENVS 111 is designed to make you aware of the various human impacts that affect our environment in the Santa Barbara area. The challenges we face locally are similar to those found throughout the world, so what you learn in this course is not limited to the local area. This course involves studies that demonstrate ecological/environmental principles through observation and analysis of many different communities and sites of environmental concern.  This course examines the techniques used to measure and counter the human impacts. This course also explores the human values embedded in the choices we make to protect or preserve an area or species.  

    Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences when combined with ENVS 110. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lab
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable
    UC Transfer Limit: No credit for ENVS 111 unless taken after or concurrently with 110.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Collect data using field water chemistry analysis equipment
    2. Collect data for abundance and distribution of populations in a variety of habitats using observational techniques.
    3. Describe ecological relationships and the impact of the loss of species at different trophic levels
    4. Identify ecological problems and human impacts in evidence at a site
    5. Describe the process of waste water treatment, waste disposal, air pollution monitoring, energy development and use, and the impacts of these activities on the human population and surrounding environment.
    6. Describe and explain conflict resolution.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. ENVS 111 SLO 1 - Explain how global environmental issues affect our local region.
    2. ENVS 111 SLO 2 - Explain how local human activities affect the environment and how changes in the environment affect the local ecology and human population.
  •  Plant Diversity is a general biology course emphasizing the biology of plants and related forms, their structures and life processes and the principles of evolution and ecology that determine plant diversity and distribution. Plant Diversity is a combined lecture-laboratory course that satisfies the SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences and transfers to all UC and California State University campuses where it satisfies a general education requirement for a life science laboratory course.

    By the end of the course, you should be able to describe fundamental molecular, cellular, anatomical and physiological characters of plants and major evolutionary changes that have occurred from ancestral forms resulting in the distribution of plants on Earth.

    Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. 
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable. 
    UC Transfer Limit: BOT 100, 121, and 122 combined: maximum credit, two courses.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the system by which plants are organized within the various taxa,
    2. Describe the structure and function of plant cell structures,
    3. Compare and contrast the structures and functions of the vascular, support, reproductive and hormonal systems among the plant phyla,
    4. Describe the life histories of plants from all major phyla,
    5. Describe the processes of organic evolution,
    6. Describe the evolutionary relationships among plant phyla,
    7. Compare and contrast the unique features among the plant phyla,
    8. Describe the embryogeny of all major phyletic lineages,
    9. Describe experiments elucidating growth and development of plants,
    10. Describe the physical and biological parameters that govern the distribution of life on earth, and
    11. Describe the physical and biological parameters that govern the size of plant populations.
    12. Describe pollination biology and the interdependence of animals and plants.
    13. Identify any common plant to phylum and class.
    14. Accurately and professionally preserve plants from a variety of phyla.
    15. Identify significant internal and external features of plants.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. BOT 121 SLO 1 - Summarize the fundamental molecular and cellular principles critical to an understanding of plant biology.
    2. BOT 121 SLO 2 - Describe the functional anatomy of non-vascular and vascular plants including life histories, reproduction and development, primary and secondary growth, and movement of water and food within the plant.
    3. BOT 121 SLO 3 - Describe the evolutionary history and characteristics of the major floras that have occurred since the transition of plants to land.
    4. BOT 121 SLO 4 - Produce laboratory and field reports based on plant collection, observation, dissection, and experimentation with proper presentation techniques, data analysis and discussion of results.
  • Animal Diversity is a general zoology course emphasizing the variety of structures, functions and adaptations of protozoa and animals. It  introduces the basic principles of evolution and emphasizes the evolutionary history and processes that led to the rich diversity of life on our planet today.

    Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences when combined with ZOOL 123. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the system by which animals are organized within the various taxa.
    2. Describe the structure and function of animal cells.
    3. Compare and contrast the structures and functions of animal skeletal, digestive, nervous, circulatory, reproductive, endocrine, muscular, osmoregulatory, and sensory systems among the animal phyla.
    4. Describe the life histories of animals from all major phyla.
    5. Describe the processes of evolution and the evolutionary history and relationships of major phyla.
    6. Describe embryogeny and post-embryonic growth and development of all major phyla.
    7. Describe the physical and biological parameters that govern the distribution and the size of animal populations.
    8. Describe experiments differentiating innate from learned behavior and demonstrating communication between animals.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. Describe the origin of animals, the characters that define "animal", and the major trends in the diversification of invertebrates and vertebrates through evolutionary history.
    2. Characterize and differentiate the structural and functional characteristics of major animal phyla and how these have led to a natural, phylogenetic grouping of animal clades.
    3. Describe the major evolutionary changes that have occurred in past and present animal assemblages over time and across oceans and continents.
    4. Compare and contrast the completion of life histories of animals from all major phyla.
  •  Zoology 123 labs are designed to provide students with a hands-on experience examining a wide breadth of animals representing different animal phyla. Students closely examine live and preserved specimens to gain a strong understanding and appreciation for the wide diversity in animal life cycles, body morphology and adaptations. 

    Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences when combined with ZOOL 122. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lab
    Transfer Information: CSUGE Area B3, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the system by which animals are organized within the various taxa,
    2. Describe the structure and function of animal cell structures,
    3. Compare and contrast the structures and functions of animal skeletal, digestive, nervous, circulatory, reproductive, endocrine, muscular, osmoregulatory, and sensory systems among the animal phyla,
    4. Describe the life histories of animals from all major phyla,
    5. Describe the processes of organic evolution and the evolutionary relationships of major phyla,
    6. Compare and contrast the unique features among the animal phyla,
    7. Describe the embryogeny of all major phyletic lineages,
    8. Identify any common animal to phylum and class
    9. Accurately and professionally dissect animals from a wide variety of phyla,
    10. Identify significant internal and external features of animals, and
    11. Describe functions of structures from a wide variety of animal groups.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. ZOOL 123 SLO 1 - Identify invertebrates and vertebrates to phylum and class, and common animals to species and create hand-drawn illustrations of animals from all major phyla, identifying both internal and external anatomical features and larval stages.
    2. ZOOL 123 SLO 2 - Examine life histories and reproductive strategies of specific animals from different animal phyla and the role these have played in the evolution of diversity within groups.
    3. ZOOL 123 SLO 3 - Use proper laboratory procedures such as the use of compound and dissecting microscopes, microslide preparation, proper handling and care of live animals, and proper dissection techniques of animals from a variety of animal phyla for revealing internal anatomy and the relationship of organs and organ systems
  •  Introduction to anatomy, physiology, ecology, behavior and diversity of insects and other terrestrial arthropods
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the anatomy and physiology of insects and related forms.
    2. Describe the life histories of insects including reproduction, growth and development.
    3. Provide an annotated outline of the evolutionary history of insects from their origins to diversification on land.
    4. Identify insects to family and describe the characters that differentiate orders and families of insects.
    5. Explain and provide examples of the ecological roles of insects.
    6. Describe methods and results of experiments investigating insect learning and behavior.
    7. Describe the evolutionary history and development of insect social behavior.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. ZOOL 124 SLO 1 - Describe the fundamental molecular and cellular principles critical to an understanding of insects.
    2. ZOOL 124 SLO 2 - Describe the anatomical and physiological characteristics of members of the major insect groups and related forms and how this has led to a natural phylogenetic grouping of insect clades.
    3. ZOOL 124 SLO 3 - Describe the evolutionary history of the arthropod lineage from origins in the sea to expansion on land and flight.
    4. ZOOL 124 SLO 4 - Describe the social behavior and symbiotic relationships of insects, including insects as vectors of human disease.
  •  Systematics, distribution, physiology, behavior and ecology of birds. Emphasis on diversity, functional morphology and evolutionary history.
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the current theories of bird origins.
    2. Describe the physical principles of flight and the particular adaptations of flighted birds.
    3. Explain the techniques and theories of systematics and the development of bird phylogenics.
    4. Identify and describe the structures of bird anatomy and describe their functions.
    5. Describe inter- and intraspecific behaviors of birds.
    6. Describe the major sensory systems and understand how they function in communication.
    7. Describe bird migrations and theories of navigation.
    8. Describe bird social behaviors and their adaptive advantages.
    9. Describe reproduction in birds and the production and development of the egg.
    10. Describe the factors determining bird distribution and population growth.
    11. Integrate the concepts of functional anatomy, behavior, biogeography and ecology through descriptions of the life histories of birds.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. ZOOL 137 SLO 1 - Describe current theories of bird origins and the diversification of birds through time.
    2. ZOOL 137 SLO 2 - Describe the functional anatomy of birds, related to flight, communication, reproduction, migration, navigation, and social behavior.
    3. ZOOL 137 SLO 3 - Describe bird mating systems, reproduction, egg production, embryogeny and post-embryonic development, and altricial and precocial strategies.
    4. ZOOL 137 SLO 4 - Describe the factors influencing bird life histories, geographic distribution and population growth.
  •  What is evolution?  What are its causes, how and why does it vary from one population or species to another, and what does it have to do with genes, randomness, and the environment?  A famous biologist once said “Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution,” and indeed biologists now view the world and all biological inquiry through the lens of evolution and adaptation.  In Bio 112, we study the development of Darwin’s theory of evolution, and tie ideas of natural selection in with more recent knowledge from the fields of genetics, DNA analysis, development, and paleontology.  Throughout the course, we emphasize how the process of evolution connects all species while at the same time making each of us unique.

     In combination with BIOL 141, BIOL 112 satisfies General Education requirement in Natural Sciences. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe principles of evolution.
    2. Correlate historical events with advances in understanding of evolutionary processes.
    3. Describe the underlying genetic basis of inherited characteristics.
    4. Solve elementary problems of Mendelian and population genetics.
    5. Explain the underlying bases of systematics, classification and taxonomy.
    6. Describe the functional design of major taxa of each kingdom with special emphasis on trends of major invertebrate and vertebrate group evolution.
    7. Describe the chemical evolution of Universe and Earth and the scientific theories relating to the origin of life.
    8. Provide an annotated time scale of the history of life on Earth.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. BIOL 112 SLO 1 - Describe the historical development of the principles of evolution and correlate historical advances of evolutionary theory with advances in the understanding of biological processes.
    2. BIOL 112 SLO 2 - Describe the underlying genetic basis of inherited characteristics and solve elementary problems of Mendelian and population genetics
    3. BIOL 112 SLO 3 - Describe the functional design of major taxa of each of life’s kingdoms with special emphasis on trends of evolution within the major phylogenetic lineages over time and adaptations that determine reproductive success and speciation.
    4. BIOL 112 SLO 4 - Evaluate the hypotheses explaining the sources of variety and direction of changing genotypes and phenotypes through mutation, genetic drift, natural selection, coevolution and life history traits as components of fitness.
  •  Natural History is a very broad field that emphasizes observation of the natural world. In this course, we study concepts of botany, zoology, ecology, evolution, geology, meteorology, and more, and apply our knowledge to examination of our local natural habitats.  Weekly labs are primarily field trips to spots of interest in and around Santa Barbara.  These include walks on the beach, hikes in the hills, and sampling of streams and tide pools.  Whether you’ve lived in Santa Barbara your whole life or are new to the area, Bio 120 is a great way to get to know your local environment.

    Satisfies SBCC General Education requirement in Natural Sciences.
    SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, CSU GE Area B3, IGETC Area 5B, IGETC Area 5C, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable.

    Course Objectives:
    1. Define the natural forces at work on Earth and their influences on organisms.
    2. Give examples of local ecosystems, including their physical, biological and ecological make-up.
    3. Recognize a variety of ecosystems and see the same biological principles repeated again and again.
    4. Identify the major organisms in various ecosystems and their adaptations to the unique physical and biological factors of that ecosystem.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. BIOL 120 SLO 1 - Distinguish major groups of organisms based on their structures, means of producing or acquiring food, and life history.
    2. BIOL 120 SLO 2 - Compare and contrast different communities through a description of the diversity of organisms, the biological and physical factors that determine geographic range, and the adaptations that make each species successful in their particular habitat and niche.
    3. BIOL 120 SLO 3 - Identify and describe major ecological, geological, climatological, and historical forces that shape global and local landscapes and ecosystems.
  •  The study of ecology is the study of interactions among organisms and their environment. Organisms and populations as integrated elements of communities and ecosystems. Population structure, growth and evolution; relationships between species: competition, predation, coevolution; community structure and development; biodiversity; biogeography.

    Satisfies SBCC General Education Requirement in Natural Sciences when combined with Biology 123. SBCC General Education: SBCC GE Area A Lecture
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Course Objectives:
    1. Describe the history of Earth, continental drift, climate history, changing biogeographic regions, and major extinctions.
    2. Describe the physical laws of thermodynamics, the driving force attributed to electromagnetic radiation, and the flow and cycling of matter through ecosystems.
    3. Explain the biome concept and compare and contrast different biomes.
    4. Describe homeostasis at the organism, population, community and ecosystem levels and thermodynamic views of the “ecosystem”.
    5. Describe primary production, its measurement, the interplay of light and temperature, and limiting factors in a variety of ecosystems.
    6. Explain food chains and food webs and describe direction, rates, and efficiencies of transfer.
    7. List and define common mating systems and sexual selection and describe the underlying strategies of each.
    8. List, define and describe the elements comprising population structure, size, distribution, range, variation and growth.
    9. Describe the relationship between genotype and phenotype and the extensions of Mendelian genetics to population genetics and evolution.
    10. Define symbioses in both broad and narrow contexts and describe life history adaptations, coevolution, and evolutionary tempo and mode.
    11. Describe predator-prey cycles and the experiments that have been utilized to understand their continuity and stability.
    12. Describe the concepts of phylogeography, vicariance, metapopulations and reproductive isolation and the use of genetic/molecular techniques of analysis.
    13. Describe "biological community" as a natural unit of ecological organization.
    14. Describe the mechanisms used to analyze species abundance, diversity and richness in communities.
    15. Define succession and the concepts of sere, succession, and transient and cyclic climaxes.
    16. Describe geographic patterns of species diversity and the relationship to the concept of niche.
    Student Learning Outcomes:
    1. BIOL 122 SLO 1 - Describe gene transmission from generation to generation in populations, the five “forces” that drive evolution and how gene frequencies change.
    2. BIOL 122 SLO 2 - Describe population growth, survivorship, distribution, the limitations to growth, and the effects of reproductive isolation.
    3. BIOL 122 SLO 3 - Describe "niche" and "community" and the conditions that operate in neutral and niche-based models of community structure using examples of adaptations of organisms from a variety of habitats and examples of communities both ancient and modern.
    4. BIOL 122 SLO 4 - Compare and contrast nutrient flow within aquatic, marine and terrestrial ecosystems using multiple examples from a variety of habitats.
  •  BIOL 150 will next be offered in Summer II, 2020. Instructor: Larry Friesen

    Course Advisories: High school biology. Skills Advisories: Eligibility for ENG 110 or 110H
    Transfer Information: CSU GE Area B2, IGETC Area 5B, CSU Transferable, UC Transferable

    Diversity, adaptations and evolutionary history of life on Earth; principles of ecology and evolution. Examination of theories of systematics and nomenclature.

    Sample Assignments:
    All exams are of the narrative essay form following a style guide specific to the course. Each exam comprises four or five questions (with subparts) requiring use of information from the course textbook, course lectures, and other sources as assigned. Sample Question: Define biodiversity from at least three different perspectives and with different definitions. Describe the various methods and principles by which biodiversity is measured and the strengths and weaknesses of each method for different biological communities.

    Student Learning Outcomes:
    BIOL 150 SLO 1 - Describe the molecular and structural unity of life, explain how evolution, natural selection and natural phenomena increase and decrease biodiversity, and discuss the reasons that certain areas of Earth are “biodiversity hotspots”.

    BIOL 150 SLO 2 - Describe the history of biodiversity on Earth, the sequence of appearance of organisms in a taxonomic/systematic context, and the times and causes of mass extinctions.

    BIOL 150 SLO 3 - Compare and contrast experimental methods and mathematical formulae that are used to define biodiversity, species richness, abundance, carrying capacity, and population growth and structure.

    BIOL 150 SLO 4 - Describe the characteristics of phyla and superphyla, how morphological characters and analysis of genomes can be used to define and divide populations of organisms of different ancestry as well as unite related groups, and discuss the reasons that some clades are difficult to place on the “tree of life”.