The Anchor - Substance Abuse Counseling and Education

The Anchor Program offers assessment, early intervention, confidential counseling, recovery support, referrals, education, and more to the SBCC community. We are committed to supporting all students make safe and informed, and purposeful choices around substance use that promote and encourage a healthy balanced lifestyle.

 

How can I make an appointment with an Anchor counselor?

Call or stop by:
Student Health & Wellness
Student Services 170
(805) 965-0581 x 2298


 

Anchor Counseling Services: 

Alcohol and drug counselors are available to meet with students to address questions, issues, and concerns related to alcohol, marijuana, tobacco, other drugs, gambling, and other addictive/compulsive behaviors. Check in with us for yourself, or for a friend.

Education, Presentations, and Outreach:

We are committed to providing education and outreach efforts. We work in partnership with many campus departments, students, and the Santa Barbara community. We offer educational support to all students around the topic of substance use by promoting safe, responsible, intentional, and educated decision around use. 

We are available to table at events and would love to partner with you! Please email: ljpeters1@pipeline.sbcc.edu if you have an event that you would like us to be involved with and we will do our best to be there!

We offer in class presentations, workshops, and support groups in conjunction with The WELL: follow the link to request a presentation or to view workshops or support groups: 

https://www.thewellsbcc.com/

 



Recovery Support:

The Anchor Program supports students in Recovery who might be in need of supportive and confidential counseling services. Counselors are either licensed marriage and family therapists or interns supervised by a licensed marriage and family therapist who specialize in alcohol and other drug counseling. We are here to help support your academic, personal and professional growth as you move through your academic goals at SBCC. 

Meetings: 

Current Meetings on SBCC Campus:

12 Step Open Meeting 
Thursdays at 12pm (Beginning August 29th)
Location: The WELL ECC21

Other Community Meetings Links and Resources for Students: 

Al-Anon https://www.alanonsantabarbara.info
Refuge Recovery www.facebook.com/groups/refugerecoverysantabarbara/
Narcotics Anonymous http://na-santabarbara.org/
Alcoholics Anonymous http://santabarbaraaa.com
SMART Recovery: https://www.smartrecovery.org/local-meetings/
Gauchos for Recovery: http://www.ucsbgfr.com/

Concerned about a friend or yourself?  

Our team of Alcohol and Drug Counseling interns are available to meet with you in a supportive, non-judgmental environment. The Anchor Program is a free and confidential program to help students who are concerned or have questions related to alcohol, marijuana, tobacco, other drugs, gambling, and other addictive/compulsive behaviors. Check in with us for yourself, or for a friend. Trained interns meet with students one on one, or with a friend, partner, or family member.

Warning Signs:

The following are warning signs that a student may have an alcohol and/or drug problem or is at risk of developing one:

  • Cuts classes/drops a class/comes to class late
  • Frequently arrives late for work
  • Makes excuses for poor performance or missing classes
  • Frequently requests extensions/turns in work late or not at all
  • Dramatic decline in academic performance
  • Comes to class with a hangover or high
  • Changes in personality; shifts in moods or emotions
  • Brags about their alcohol or other drug use; conversations are frequently about using
  • Cannot seem to have fun without drinking or using other drugs
  • Loss of motivation or energy
  • Experiences frequent health problems (illness, injury)
  • Spends most of his or her money on drugs or alcohol
  • Frequently passes out or suffers blackouts while drinking
  • Changes in appearance
  • Frequent problems with law enforcement or authorities   


How to Help a Friend 

How to help someone who has a pattern of drinking/using too much

If you know a friend that has a pattern of drinking or using too much you can help them by telling them you are concerned. It may be helpful to get support and talk to someone about your options. For a free and confidential appointment with an alcohol and other drug counselor.

Call or stop by Student Health & Wellness
Student Services 170
(805) 965-0581 x 2298    

Alcohol and Other Drug Emergencies: How to help someone who may have alcohol poisoning or drug overdose          

What Alcohol Poisoning Looks Like 
  • Person is asleep & cannot be awakened 
  • Breathing is slow or irregular
  • Skin/lips are cold, clammy, pale or bluish
  • Vomiting while passed out
What’ll Happen?
  • If someone with alcohol poisoning is left untreated, they can suffer from hypothermia, heart beats and breathing can become irregular or stop, low blood sugar (leads to seizures), severe dehydration.
  • Even if the person lives, an alcohol overdose can cause irreversible brain damage.
What to Do
  • Trust your instincts!
  • Turn the person on their side to prevent choking while vomiting.
  • Do not leave them alone or let them “sleep it off”
  • Call 911 immediately. It is free for an ambulance to come check someone out and see if they are okay. Law enforcement prioritizes medical matters over legal matters, so do not hesitate to call for help. 
  • Stay calm.

How to help someone who has a pattern of drinking/using too much

If you know a friend that has a pattern of drinking or using too much you can help them by telling them you are concerned. It may be helpful to get support and talk to someone about your options. For a free and confidential appointment with an alcohol and other drug counselor.

Call or stop by Student Health & Wellness
Student Services 170
(805) 965-0581 x 2298    

Warning Signs

The following warning signs can signify a possible problem with alcohol/drugs:

  • Loss of control when using
  • Family History
  • High Tolerance
  • Blackouts
  • Denial
  • Using to feel normal
  • Avoidance 
  • Unpredictable behavior
  • Obsessed attempting to control use
  • Makes excuses for poor performance or missing classes
  • Frequently requests extensions/turns in work late or not at all
  • Dramatic decline in academic performance
  • Comes to class with a hangover or high
  • Changes in personality; shifts in moods or emotions
  • Brags about their alcohol or other drug use
  • Conversations are frequently about using
  • Cannot seem to have fun without drinking or using other drugs
  • Loss of motivation or energy
  • Experiences frequent health problems (illness, injury)
  • Spends most of his or her money on drugs or alcohol
  • Frequently passes out or suffers blackouts while drinking
  • Changes in appearance
  • Frequent problems with law enforcement or authorities
  • Negative consequences associated with use 

If you have a friend who exhibits these signs feel free to make an appointment with one of our counselors to get support for yourself and how to potentially support them.       

Some things to consider:
  1. Create a healthier environment for moderate drinking by sticking to a certain number of drinks that works for you, offering other things to drink besides alcohol, having mixers available, other fun activities to engage in besides drinking, etc. Remember that moderate drinking typically means "No more than 4-5 drinks in a day"
  2. Allow people to face the consequences associated with their use. Consequences are critical in the process of making changes to behaviors. 
  3. Say something! The worst thing you can do for an alcohol/drug abuser is to say nothing. Honesty can be really helpful and let’s the person know that you notice them and are aware of what is going on. Try to be specific and let them know that you are talking about it because ultimately, you care. No matter what happens, if you say something, you are a success.
  4. Change is a process that takes time. Don’t be discouraged if after you say something, nothing seems to change. You are planting seeds for the future.

Before you talk to someone who you are worried about:
  1.  One incident doesn’t mean there is a problem. It is important to remember that typically there is a pattern of unhealthy behaviors that led to a problematic relationship with substances. Be sure there is a pattern of unhealthy substance use before approaching the individual.
  2. Reflection and preparation.It is important to think about instances when an individual abuses alcohol/drugs and what the negative consequences are prior to talking with them. It can be really helpful to have this fresh in your mind or written down so that you can remember what has happened that has led up to your concern. 
  3. Timing is everything! Do not approach an individual while they are under the influence of substances. It is best to talk to the individual as soon as possible after an incident or abuse, preferably when the individual is still physically down or the negative aspects are still fresh in their mind..
  4. Be aware of your attitude and emotional state of mind. Make sure you are in the right place or frame of mind before having a conversation. Be careful of your tone and your body language. Be aware of what you might be communicating non-verbally and make sure it is congruent with the message you are trying to convey. The best attitude is one of friendly concern and/or genuine worry. 
  5. Talk non-judgmentally about what you see happening. Avoid labeling! Do not put the person on the defensive by calling them names (ie: "drunk," a "stoner," a "lush," etc).
  6. Stay in the present as much as possible. Try to talk mostly about what you see happening right now, the consequences occurring right now and why you are particularly worried right now. Avoid talk of future possibilities or imaginary consequences.